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Rx.NET in Action by Tamir Dresher

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Foreword

This book, Rx.NET in Action, does a great job in explaining the details and background that .NET developers need to effectively use Rx. In particular, it explains how to connect the plethora of asynchronous types in .NET to Rx observables, and how to deal with errors, resource allocation, and last but not least, concurrency.

Since its inception, the .NET Framework has emphasized the importance of asynchronous execution and nonblocking I/O. Through delegates, the .NET Framework has emphasized higher-order functional programming from the beginning, and by automatically defining the BeginInvoke and EndInvoke methods on delegates, developers may call any method asynchronously.

But the BeginInvoke/EndInvoke pattern for asynchronous operations ...

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