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SAS 9.4 SQL Procedure User's Guide, Fourth Edition, 4th Edition by SAS Institute

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argument-1=value-1 <argument-2=value-2 ...>
specifies that the argument must be assigned a value and that you can specify
multiple arguments. The ellipsis (...) indicates that additional arguments are allowed.
No punctuation is required between arguments.
The LABEL statement is an example of this form of multiple arguments:
LABEL variable-1=label-1 <variable-2=label-2 …>;
argument-1 <, argument-2, ...>
specifies that one argument is required and that you can specify multiple arguments
that are separated by a comma or other punctuation. The ellipsis (...) indicates a
continuation of the arguments, separated by a comma. Both forms are used in the
SAS documentation.
Here are examples of this form of multiple arguments:
AUTHPROVIDERDOMAIN (provider-1:domain-1 <, provider-2:domain-2, …>
INTO :macro-variable-specification-1 <, :macro-variable-specification-2, …>
Note: In most cases, example code in SAS documentation is written in lowercase with a
monospace font. You can use uppercase, lowercase, or mixed case in the code that
you write.
Style Conventions
The style conventions that are used in documenting SAS syntax include uppercase bold,
uppercase, and italic:
UPPERCASE BOLD
identifies SAS keywords such as the names of functions or statements. In this
example, the keyword ERROR is written in uppercase bold:
ERROR <message>;
UPPERCASE
identifies arguments that are literals.
In this example of the CMPMODEL= system option, the literals include BOTH,
CATALOG, and XML:
CMPMODEL=BOTH | CATALOG | XML |
italic
identifies arguments or values that you supply. Items in italic represent user-supplied
values that are either one of the following:
nonliteral arguments. In this example of the LINK statement, the argument label
is a user-supplied value and therefore appears in italic:
LINK label;
nonliteral values that are assigned to an argument.
In this example of the FORMAT statement, the argument DEFAULT is assigned
the variable default-format:
FORMAT variable(s) <format > <DEFAULT = default-format>;
Special Characters
The syntax of SAS language elements can contain the following special characters:
Syntax Conventions for the SAS Language ix

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