(iv) risk spreading—“don’t put all your eggs in one basket”
(v) risk assumption—it is not worth worrying about or it can not be avoided
5. Implement countermeasures
(a) Discreet placement without sacrificing effectiveness
(b) Appropriate sites for alarms
(c) Proper installation
6. Evaluate countermeasures
(a) Test for effectiveness—can measures be improved?
(b) Test under different conditions
(i) weather—snow, rain, wind
(ii) daytime and nighttime
(iii) periods of heavy traffic
(c) Test for durability
Appendix B
Source: Risk Analysis and the Security Survey by James Broder, Butterworth-Heinemann, 1984.
Frequency of Loss
Severity of loss High Medium Low
High Avoidance Loss prevention and
avoidance
Transfer via
insurance
Assumption and
pooling
Loss prevention Loss prevention and
assumption
Avoidance and loss
prevention
Loss prevention and
transfer via insurance
Medium
Low Assumption
FIGURE 1 Decision matrix: A risk handling decision aid.
250 SECURITY SUPERVISION AND MANAGEMENT
Probability Criticality
(1) Virtually certain (A) Fatal
Very serious
Moderately serious
Serious
Relatively unimportant
Criticality unknown
(B)
(C)
(D)
(E)
(F)
Highly probable
Moderately probable
Probable
Improbable
Probability unknown
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
Adapted from: Richard J. Healy and Timothy J. Walsh (1971). Industrial Security Management. New Yo
r
American Management Association, p. 17.
FIGURE 2 Probability/criticality/vulnerability matrix.
Appendix C
Source: Introduction to Security, 4th ed. by Gion Green and Robert Fischer, Butterworth-
Heinemann, 1987.

Get Security Supervision and Management, 3rd Edition now with the O’Reilly learning platform.

O’Reilly members experience books, live events, courses curated by job role, and more from O’Reilly and nearly 200 top publishers.