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Social Capital, Social Identities by Hans Bernhard Schmid, Christoph Henning, Dieter Thomä

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1

In his paper, Hans Bernhard Schmid stresses the paradox of social capital – and presses: “Social capital brings evil into the world.”

2

For another account of the humanities’ transformative effects on economics, see Nussbaum (2010).

3

“Man, by being master of himself, and proprietor of his own person, and the actions or labour of it, had […] in himself the great foundation of property” – “His labour hath taken it out of the hands of nature, where it was common, and belonged equally to all her children, and hath thereby appropriated it to himself.” Cf. Locke 1988, 298, 289 (II. 40; II. 29); cf. II. 26, 28, 120.

4

Annas 1993, 262, argues in favor of using “familiarization.” Long and Sedley 1987, Vol. I, 350, prefer “appropriation”. It should ...

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