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Special Edition Using Enterprise JavaBeans™ 2.0 by Brian Keeton, Chuck Cavaness

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The JNDI Environment Properties

Before the client can use the services offered by JNDI, it must first locate the service on the network and get a connection. It’s sort of a paradox if you think about it. A client uses JNDI to locate remote services, but the JNDI service is possibly a remote service itself. So how is a naming service located if you don’t have a naming service to start with? The JNDI answer is by using environment properties.

Environment properties are the way that a JNDI client application communicates various preferences and properties that are used to establish a connection with the JNDI environment. Not only properties about where to find the JNDI naming service, but many more types of properties can be specified. For example, ...

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