Spring in Action, 4th Ed, video edition

Video description

"The classic, remastered and full of awesomeness."
Mario Arias, Cake Solutions Ltd

Spring in Action, Fourth Edition is a hands-on guide to the Spring Framework, updated for version 4. It covers its latest features, tools, and practices including Spring MVC, REST, Security, Web Flow, and more. You'll move between short snippets and an ongoing example as you learn to build simple and efficient J2EE applications. Author Craig Walls has a special knack for crisp and entertaining examples that zoom in on the features and techniques you really need.

Designed in 2003 as a lighter approach to J2EE development, Spring Framework has since become a standard choice for building enterprise applications and required knowledge for Java developers. Spring 4 provides full Java 8 integration along with key upgrades like new annotations for the IoC container, improvements to Spring Expression Language, and much-needed support for REST. Whether you're just discovering Spring or you want to absorb the new features, there's no better way to master Spring than with this book.
Inside:

  • Updated for Spring 4
  • Spring Data for NoSQL
  • Simplifying configuration with annotations and definition profiles
  • Working with RESTful resources
Nearly 100,000 developers have used the book version to learn Spring! Spring in Action requires a working knowledge of Java.

Craig Walls is a software developer at Pivotal. He's a popular author and a frequent speaker at user groups and conferences. Craig lives in Cross Roads, Texas.

Informative, accurate and insightful!
Jeelani Shaik, D3Banking.com

After ten years, this is still the clearest and most comprehensive introduction to the core concepts of the Spring platform.
James Wright, Sword-Apak

NARRATED BY MARK THOMAS

Table of contents

  1. PART 1 CORE SPRING
    1. Chapter 1. Springing into action
    2. Chapter 1. Injecting dependencies
    3. Chapter 1. Applying aspects
    4. Chapter 1. Eliminating boilerplate code with templates
    5. Chapter 1. Containing your beans
    6. Chapter 1. Surveying the Spring landscape
    7. Chapter 1. The Spring portfolio
    8. Chapter 1. What’s new in Spring
    9. Chapter 1. What’s new in Spring 4.0?
    10. Chapter 2. Wiring beans
    11. Chapter 2. Automatically wiring beans
    12. Chapter 2. Naming a component-scanned bean
    13. Chapter 2. Wiring beans with Java
    14. Chapter 2. Wiring beans with XML
    15. Chapter 2. Initializing a bean with constructor injection
    16. Chapter 2. Setting properties
    17. Chapter 2. Importing and mixing configurations
    18. Chapter 3. Advanced wiring
    19. Chapter 3. Activating profiles
    20. Chapter 3. Conditional beans
    21. Chapter 3. Addressing ambiguity in autowiring
    22. Chapter 3. Qualifying autowired beans
    23. Chapter 3. Scoping beans
    24. Chapter 3. Runtime value injection
    25. Chapter 3. Wiring with the Spring Expression Language
    26. Chapter 3. SPeL operators
    27. Chapter 4. Aspect-oriented Spring
    28. Chapter 4. Defining AOP terminology
    29. Chapter 4. Spring’s AOP support
    30. Chapter 4. Selecting join points with pointcuts
    31. Chapter 4. Creating annotated aspects
    32. Chapter 4. Handling parameters in advice
    33. Chapter 4. Declaring aspects in XML
    34. Chapter 4. Introducing new functionality with aspects
  2. PART 2 SPRING ON THE WEB
    1. Chapter 5. Building Spring web applications
    2. Chapter 5. Setting up Spring MVC
    3. Chapter 5. Enabling Spring MVC
    4. Chapter 5. Writing a simple controller
    5. Chapter 5. Passing model data to the view
    6. Chapter 5. Accepting request input
    7. Chapter 5. Processing forms
    8. Chapter 5. Validating forms
    9. Chapter 6. Rendering web views
    10. Chapter 6. Creating JSP views
    11. Chapter 6. Using Spring’s JSP libraries
    12. Chapter 6. Displaying errors
    13. Chapter 6. Spring's general tag library
    14. Chapter 6. Creating URLs
    15. Chapter 6. Defining a layout with Apache Tiles views
    16. Chapter 6. Working with Thymeleaf
    17. Chapter 6. Defining Thymeleaf templates
    18. Chapter 7. Advanced Spring MVC
    19. Chapter 7. Adding additional servlets and filters
    20. Chapter 7. Processing multipart form data
    21. Chapter 7. Handling multipart requests
    22. Chapter 7. Handling exceptions
    23. Chapter 7. Advising controllers
    24. Chapter 7. Working with flash attributes
    25. Chapter 8. Working with Spring Web Flow
    26. Chapter 8. The components of a flow
    27. Chapter 8. Transitions
    28. Chapter 8. Putting it all together: the pizza flow
    29. Chapter 8. Collecting customer information
    30. Chapter 8. Building an order
    31. Chapter 9. Securing web applications
    32. Chapter 9. Writing a simple security configuration
    33. Chapter 9. Selecting user details services
    34. Chapter 9. Applying LDAP-backed authentication
    35. Chapter 9. Intercepting requests
    36. Chapter 9. Enforcing channel security
    37. Chapter 9. Authenticating users
    38. Chapter 9. Securing the view
    39. Chapter 9. Working with Thymeleaf’s Spring Security dialect
  3. PART 3 SPRING IN THE BACK END
    1. Chapter 10. Hitting the database with Spring and JDBC
    2. Chapter 10. Getting to know Spring’s data-access exception hierarchy
    3. Chapter 10. Templating data access
    4. Chapter 10. Configuring a data source
    5. Chapter 10. Using an embedded data source
    6. Chapter 10. Using JDBC with Spring
    7. Chapter 10. Working with JDBC templates
    8. Chapter 11. Persisting data with object-relational mapping
    9. Chapter 11. Declaring a Hibernate session factory
    10. Chapter 11. Spring and the Java Persistence API
    11. Chapter 11. Configuring an entity manager factory
    12. Chapter 11. Writing a JPA-based repository
    13. Chapter 11. Automatic JPA repositories with Spring Data
    14. Chapter 11. Defining query methods
    15. Chapter 11. Declaring custom queries
    16. Chapter 12. Working with NoSQL databases
    17. Chapter 12. Enabling MongoDB
    18. Chapter 12. Accessing MongoDB with MongoTemplate
    19. Chapter 12. Writing a MongoDB repository
    20. Chapter 12. Working with graph data in Neo4j
    21. Chapter 12. Annotating graph entities
    22. Chapter 12. Creating automatic Neo4j repositories
    23. Chapter 12. Working with key-value data in Redis
    24. Chapter 12. Setting key and value serializers
    25. Chapter 13. Caching data
    26. Chapter 13. Configuring a cache manager
    27. Chapter 13. Annotating methods for caching
    28. Chapter 13. Removing cache entries
    29. Chapter 14. Securing methods
    30. Chapter 14. Using expressions for method-level security
    31. Chapter 14. Filtering method inputs and outputs
  4. PART 4 INTEGRATING SPRING
    1. Chapter 15. Working with remote services
    2. Chapter 15. Working with RMI
    3. Chapter 15. Wiring an RMI service
    4. Chapter 15. Exposing remote services with Hessian and Burlap
    5. Chapter 15. Using Spring’s HttpInvoker
    6. Chapter 15. Publishing and consuming web services
    7. Chapter 15. Proxying JAX-WS services on the client side
    8. Chapter 16. Creating REST APIs with Spring MVC
    9. Chapter 16. Creating your first REST endpoint
    10. Chapter 16. Negotiating resource representation
    11. Chapter 16. ContentNegotiationManager added in Spring 3.2
    12. Chapter 16. Working with HTTP message converters
    13. Chapter 16. Serving more than resources
    14. Chapter 16. Setting headers in the response
    15. Chapter 16. Consuming REST resources
    16. Chapter 16. Extracting response metadata
    17. Chapter 16. Receiving object responses from POST requests
    18. Chapter 16. Exchanging resources
    19. Chapter 17. Messaging in Spring
    20. Chapter 17. Assessing the benefits of asynchronous messaging
    21. Chapter 17. Sending messages with JMS
    22. Chapter 17. Using Spring’s JMS template
    23. Chapter 17: Setting a default destination
    24. Chapter 17. Creating message-driven POJOs
    25. Chapter 17. Using message-based RPC
    26. Chapter 17. Messaging with AMQP
    27. Chapter 17. Configuring Spring for AMQP messaging
    28. Chapter 17. Receiving AMQP messages
    29. Chapter 18. Messaging with WebSocket and STOMP
    30. Chapter 18. Coping with a lack of WebSocket support
    31. Chapter 18. Working with STOMP messaging
    32. Chapter 18. Handling STOMP messages from the client
    33. Chapter 18. Sending messages to the client
    34. Chapter 18. Working with user-targeted messages
    35. Chapter 18. Sending messages to a specific user
    36. Chapter 19. Sending email with Spring
    37. Chapter 19. Constructing rich email messages
    38. Chapter 19. Generating email with templates
    39. Chapter 20. Managing Spring beans with JMX
    40. Chapter 20. Exposing methods by name
    41. Chapter 20. Working with annotation-driven MBeans
    42. Chapter 20. Remoting MBeans
    43. Chapter 20. Handling notifications
    44. Chapter 21. Simplifying Spring development with Spring Boot
    45. Chapter 21. Autoconfiguration
    46. Chapter 21. Building an application with Spring Boot
    47. Chapter 21. Adding static artifacts
    48. Chapter 21. Try it out
    49. Chapter 21. Going Groovy with the Spring Boot CLI
    50. Chapter 21. Running the Spring Boot CLI
    51. Chapter 21. Gaining application insight with the Actuator

Product information

  • Title: Spring in Action, 4th Ed, video edition
  • Author(s): Craig Walls
  • Release date: November 2018
  • Publisher(s): Manning Publications
  • ISBN: None