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Staying Legal: A Guide to Copyright and Trademark Use by Francine Ward

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Lesson 1 :What Is a Copyright?

Someone recently asked me to copyright her book title. “It can’t be done,” I said. “You cannot copyright a book title.” If a book title is to be protected at all, it would likely be through trademark protection or some form of contract. “You’re wrong,” she insisted, “My friend copyrighted his book.” As I listened more closely to what she said, I realized she had confused copyrighting her book with copyrighting the book’s title. I thought to myself, I wonder how many other people have made that very same mistake, or how many people, in some way, have confused copyrights with trademarks? So, while they are both part of the family called intellectual property—something you own, which you design, develop, conceive, ...

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