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Stock Photography - Make Money Selling Photos Online

Book Description

Make Money Selling Photos Online

The must have on stock photography in its third edition – revised and extended, new and up-to-date content – and finally in English Getting the equipment right, selecting the perfect subject, working with models, choosing the right keywords, finding an adequate agency: All you need to know about workflows and licensing models With an additional chapter on US Copyright Law Basics by Nancy E. Wolf

Stock photography is getting more and more popular. Predictably so with magazines, publishing houses and advertising agencies, but even more so with private persons who, for instance, buy stock photos in order to use them on their websites. For you to be a successful stock photographer, though, it takes more than just uploading your latest holiday snapshots on the website of whatever agency.

In this completely revised edition of his German-language bestseller, Robert Kneschke – a German bestselling author, well-known blogger and successful stock photographer – demonstrates what a good stock photo is all about and what you can do to make it sell. Newcomers eager to earn just a little extra money will benefit from reading the book as well as amateur photographers who have been selling photos for years and are now aiming for the professional champions league.

The book is divided in two parts: “Taking Photos” and “Selling Photos”.

The first part focuses on technical aspects of the shooting and presents perfect examples of lovely, popular and attractive images which will easily sell. It deals with Props, locations and the different ways of working with models and it gives brief overviews of stock audio and stock video. This part is supplemented with an additional chapter on US Copyright Law Basics for Photographers written by Nancy E. Wolff, a practicing lawyer for more than twenty years, Legal Counsel of the Picture Archive Council of America (PACA) and author of “The Professional Photographer’s Legal Handbook”.

The second part of the book introduces the reader into the necessary routine and workflow he or she should follow as a professional stock photographer. Keywording and statistics, though often underestimated, are essential parts of a stock photographer’s job, so Robert Kneschke deals with them extensively and thoroughly. The author also lists the most popular agencies, weighs their pros and cons and shows the various licensing models on the market. Real world examples of stock photographers and their earnings and interviews with them allow the reader an even deeper insight into the business mechanics of stock photography.

If you are looking for advice on how to find your way around as a professional in a highly competitive market and how to make money with your own photos, this classic by Robert Kneschke is the book to consult.

Testimonials referring to previous editions

I´ve said it before and I´ll say it again: This book is definitely THE classic on stock photography in the German-language book market.
fotografr.de

This is the book for people who are serious about making money with their own photos. The author himself is making a living from taking photos and selling them. So he knows what he is writing about. I assume there are very few people who know so much about the different ways of licensing and selling with all sorts of microstock agencies involved.
DigitalPhoto

Robert Kneschke – quite impressively – shows in his book, that stock photography is more than just trying to sell holiday and animal photos. Going far beyond such topics as choosing the right subject and technical details of the actual shooting, the book gives professional advice on legal matters, key wording as well as well-grounded background information on how to eventually make money with your own photos
Chip

Table of Contents

  1. English Edition: Preface
  2. Chapter 1: Introduction
    1. 1.1 About Stock Photography
    2. 1.2 A Short History of Stock Photography
    3. 1.3 Stock Photography and ​Assignment Photography – The Differences
    4. 1.4 Is this Book for You?
    5. 1.5 How this Book Works
    6. 1.6 Photography – Job or Leisure
    7. 1.7 About the Author
  3. Chapter 2: Gear​
    1. 2.1 ​Camera
    2. 2.2 ​Lenses
    3. 2.3 Accessories
    4. 2.4 Brief Comment on Expensive Gear
  4. Chapter 3: Lighting
    1. 3.1 Compact Flash
    2. 3.2 ​Studio Strobes
    3. 3.3 ​Modifiers
    4. 3.4 Off-Camera Lighting
    5. 3.5 Fixing the Flash
    6. 3.6 ​Learning Lighting
  5. Chapter 4: Design Rules​
    1. 4.1 Color
    2. 4.2 ​Shape
    3. 4.3 ​Perspective
    4. 4.4 ​Contrast
    5. 4.5 Learning to See
    6. 4.6 What Is a Good Stock Photo?
    7. 4.7 Design Guidelines for Stock Photos
    8. 4.8 Changing Orientation
    9. 4.9 Trend Spotting
    10. 4.10 Breaking the Rules
  6. Chapter 5: Popular Subjects
    1. 5.1 People
    2. 5.2 Business
    3. 5.3 ​Food
    4. 5.4 ​Holidays
    5. 5.5 ​​Cut-Outs
    6. 5.6 ​Textures and ​Backgrounds
  7. Chapter 6: More Subjects
    1. 6.1 Flowers and Plants
    2. 6.2 Animals and Zoos
    3. 6.3 Architecture
    4. 6.4 ​Illustrations and Vectors
    5. 6.5 ​Travel Photography
    6. 6.6 ​Art Photos
    7. 6.7 Different Subjects for ​Microstock and ​Macrostock
  8. Chapter 7: Technical Image Quality
    1. 7.1 Technical Requirements
    2. 7.2 Selling Scans?
    3. 7.3 ​Metadata
  9. Chapter 8: Inspiration​
    1. 8.1 Collecting ​Newspaper Clippings
    2. 8.2 ​Postcards
    3. 8.3 ​Catalogs
    4. 8.4 ​Media Use
    5. 8.5 Internet Search
    6. 8.6 Get Inspiration – Don't Just Copy
  10. Chapter 9: Working with Models​
    1. 9.1 Difference between Models and Amateurs
    2. 9.2 Finding Models
    3. 9.3 Choosing a Model
    4. 9.4 Preparing the Models
    5. 9.5 Working with Models
    6. 9.6 Paying the Models
  11. Chapter 10: Props​
    1. 10.1 What Are Good Props?
    2. 10.2 Finding Props
    3. 10.3 Which Props To Use?
    4. 10.4 Prop List for Beginners
    5. 10.5 A Few Words On ​Jewelry
  12. Chapter 11: Locations​
    1. 11.1 In The Studio
    2. 11.2 On Location
    3. 11.3 Outdoors
  13. Chapter 12: Legal Matters
    1. 12.1 Trademark Rights and Other Property ​Rights
    2. 12.2 ​Digital Contracts
    3. 12.3 What To Do in Case of Image Theft
    4. 12.4 Too Much Bureaucracy?
  14. Chapter 13: Copyright Law Basics for Photography – United States Perspective
    1. 13.1 ​Copyright (and ​usage rights)
    2. 13.2 ​Personality Rights
    3. 13.3 ​Copyright Enforcement: What to do when somebody uses your images without permission?
  15. Chapter 14: Lighting – The Setup​
    1. 14.1 Super Soft Light
    2. 14.2 Hard and Dark Light
    3. 14.3 Light plus Background
    4. 14.4 Simple Setups with 2 or 3 Flashes
  16. Chapter 15: Stock Audio, Stock Video and 3D Images​​
    1. 15.1 Stock Video
    2. 15.2 Stock Audio
    3. 15.3 3D Images
  17. Chapter 16: Workflow​
  18. Chapter 17: Selecting Images​
  19. Chapter 18: Image Editing​
    1. 18.1 Typical Flaws and Solutions
  20. Chapter 19: Keywording​​
    1. 19.1 The Importance of Search Terms
    2. 19.2 Types of Keywording
    3. 19.3 Correct Universal Keywording
    4. 19.4 Entering Keywords
    5. 19.5 Keywording Programs
    6. 19.6 ​Keyword Spamming
    7. 19.7 Popular Keywords
    8. 19.8 Outsourcing Keywording?
    9. 19.9 Translating Keywords
    10. 19.10 Search Terms for ​Stock Video and ​Stock Audio
    11. 19.11 Image Title and Description
    12. 19.12 Keywording Tips
  21. Chapter 20: File Organization and Archiving​
    1. 20.1 Naming Files
    2. 20.2 Creating a Model Release Spreadsheet
    3. 20.3 Backing Up Data
  22. Chapter 21: Photo Agency​
    1. 21.1 Different Agency Models
    2. 21.2 Different ​Sales Models
    3. 21.3 Finding Photo Agencies
    4. 21.4 Choosing a Photo Agency
    5. 21.5 Comments on Agency Registration
    6. 21.6 Negotiating with Photo Agencies
    7. 21.7 Rights for Photos in Agencies After ​Death
    8. 21.8 Summary of Some Photo Agencies
  23. Chapter 22: Uploading​
    1. 22.1 Checklist: Frequent Flaws in Uploaded Photos
    2. 22.2 Uploading to Agency Website
    3. 22.3 Uploading via FTP
    4. 22.4 Sending Storage Media
    5. 22.5 Contributing Photos to Agency Websites
    6. 22.6 ​Simplify Workflow
    7. 22.7 ​Offer Free Photos?
    8. 22.8 Easy ​​Photo Management
    9. 22.9 Distributing Images to Agencies via ​FTP and ​Web Server (by Marco Schwarz)
  24. Chapter 23: Statistics​
    1. 23.1 Basic Data Collection
    2. 23.2 Analysis of Helpful Values
    3. 23.3 Further Calculations
    4. 23.4 Calculating Values Automatically
    5. 23.5 Application Examples
    6. 23.6 Statistics Tools
  25. Chapter 24: Different Distribution Channels​
    1. 24.1 ​Direct Sales
    2. 24.2 Photos on Posters, T-Shirts and Cards
    3. 24.3 ​Exhibitions
    4. 24.4 ​Affiliate Links
  26. Chapter 25: Professionalism
    1. 25.1 Dealing with ​Models
    2. 25.2 ​Corporate Identity
    3. 25.3 Dealing with ​Customers and Business Partners
  27. Chapter 26: Marketing, Advertising, Information​​​
    1. 26.1 Marketing Methods for Stock Photographers
    2. 26.2 ​Finding and Collecting References
    3. 26.3 ​Signal-To-Noise Ratio
  28. Chapter 27: Insurance and Associations​
    1. 27.1 Insurance
  29. Chapter 28: Work-Related Illness​
    1. 28.1 Hand
    2. 28.2 Back
    3. 28.3 Eyes
  30. Chapter 29: Earnings
    1. 29.1 ​​Lee Torrens (microstockdiaries.com)
    2. 29.2 ​Michael Rosenwirth (micro-stock.de)
    3. 29.3 ​Roberto Marinello (mystockphoto.org)
    4. 29.4 ​Marta P. (Milacroft) (http://brandelli.wordpress.com)
    5. 29.5 ​Laurent Dambies (http://microstockexperiment.blogspot.com)
    6. 29.6 ​Marek Uliasz (http://microstock.pixelsaway.com)
    7. 29.7 ​Matt Antonino (niltomil.com)
    8. 29.8 ​​Luis Santos (http://ministocking.blogspot.com)
    9. 29.9 ​Daniel Stenzel (http://elbtunnelblick.de)
    10. 29.10 ​Michael Zwahlen (www.michaeljayfoto.com)
    11. 29.11 ​Robert Kneschke (alltageinesfotoproduzenten.de)
  31. Chapter 30: Interviews with other Stock Photographers​​
    1. 30.1 Arne Trautmann (Kzenon)
    2. 30.2 Jörg Stöber (fotogestoeber)
    3. 30.3 Luis Alvarez (Fotobäckerei)
    4. 30.4 Jörg Hempelmann (Picture-Factory)
  32. Appendix A
    1. A.1 Glossary
    2. A.2 Model Release and Property Release – Examples
    3. A.3 Further Reading
    4. A.4 Useful Links
  33. Appendix B