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Teaching Children with Autism to Mind-Read: The Workbook by Julie A. Hadwin, Patricia Howlin, Simon Baron-Cohen

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Chapter 2Visual Perspective Taking

Levels 1 and 2 aim to encourage children to think about visual perspective—the idea that people can see different things or that they can have a different visual perspective on the same object.

Level 1: Simple Perspective Taking

Simple perspective taking involves understanding that people can see different things. Here, children have to judge what another person can and cannot see. In this case what the person sees is different to what the child can see.

Materials

Use a number of different pictures on card—with pictures on both sides of the card.

For example:

  1. A pen/A key.
  2. A dog/A tree.
  3. A telephone/A flower.
  4. A car/A snake.

Assessing and teaching

Show the child the card so he/she can see that it has a picture on both sides.

Ask the child to label the object on each side of the card. (See below.)

Ask: “What's this?”

Then hold up the card between you and the child.

Ask: “What can you see?” (The child has to label the object in front of him/her.)

Ask: “What can I see?” (The child must refer to the picture on the teacher's side of the card.)

You can turn the card around so that each of you has a turn at seeing both pictures.

Simple perspective taking example: dog and tree

image

image

Teaching procedure

Hold the card between you and the child so that ...

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