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The Fashion Design Reference & Specification Book by Laura Volpintesta, Jay Calderin

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Job:02-30034 Title:RP-Fashion Design Ref and Spec Book
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14 8 THE FASHION DESIGN REFERENCE + SPECIFICATION BOOK
(Text)
14
Chapter 14: Rendering
Anyone can draw. If one can render a conclusion, one can render a drawing.
Drawing can be broken down into choices about the assembly of straight lines,
curved lines, and the shapes they can create when shortened, extended, or
connected. Fashion designers have the advantage that they work with pat-
terns and are familiar with fabric and how it folds and drapes on the body. With
this experience, to produce a good croquis, or sketch, is a matter of develop-
ing hand-to-eye coordinationwhich simply takes practice. A recommended
method for such training is to use tracing paper for corrections. Being able to
see the mistake under a correction allows the brain to process important infor-
mation. Erasers eliminate this opportunity. They also change the surface of the
paper, which can affect the rendering when using paint or markers afterward.
Some designers have a natural af nity for rendering; others will  nd that their
skills are stronger in another part of the design process. Regardless, when a
fashion drawing is simpli ed to a kind of schematic, rendering becomes less
intimidating. The point is less to draw a pretty picture than to communicate an
idea clearly.
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES
Media
All designers have their preferred media, but any combination of watercolor, marker, or pencil
offers them many ways to express their ideas on paper. Watercolors and gouache are a great
choice for laying down base colors that can be built on; they also offer an infinite amount of
color-mixing formulas. Markers fall into two categories: Color markers will provide the trans-
parent effect of watercolor, keeping in mind that designers must purchase a marker for every
shade of color they will need. Fine-line markers have an inklike quality that can be useful for
making lines pop. Both brushes and markers come in a variety of sizes and shapes that run
the gamut from wide, chunky chiseled tips to fine needlelike microtips.
Gel-tip pens can add greater dimension to the finishing process, especially when rendering
metallic details. Translucent metallic paints will often require mixing with a base color to give
the color depth. Gold metallic paint out of the tube can fall a little flat because it is being mut-
ed by a white background. Laying down a wash of bright yellow or mustard will each create very
distinct types of gold. Use white pencil, gel pen, chalk, and china markers to add highlighting.
Photographs by Tracy Aiguier.
14
Job:02-30034 Title:RP-Fashion Design Ref and Spec Book
#175 Dtp:225 Page:148
146-161_30034.indd 148 2/27/13 3:01 PM
Job:02-30034 Title:RP-Fashion Design Ref and Spec Book
#175 Dtp:225 Page:149
Book
e:148
146-161_30034.indd 149 2/27/13 3:01 PM
14 9
(Text)
t-
ry
Photographs by Tracy Aiguier.
14
Job:02-30034 Title:RP-Fashion Design Ref and Spec Book
#175 Dtp:225 Page:149
Book
e:148
146-161_30034.indd 149 2/27/13 3:01 PM

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