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The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book by Mimi Love, Chris Grimley, Linda O'Shea

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08
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THE INTERIOR DESIGN REFERENCE + SPECIFICATION BOOK
Text
Chapter 8: Code and Accessibility
Building codes and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are the two basic stan-
dards with which the interior designer needs to comply. The building code is speci-
ed by the jurisdiction in which a project will be built. These codes can be dened
by a state, county, township, or city and are typically based on a national model
such as National Building Code (BOCA), International Building Code (IBC), Interna-
tional Residential Code (IRC), and Uniform Building Code (UBC). The main focus of
these codes is to secure the public’s life safety. Codes are frequently amended,
and designers need to know which edition the jurisdiction is adhering to during the
permitting timeframe of a specic project.
ADA was passed in 1990 to secure civil rights protections for people with disabili-
ties. Unlike the building code, ADA includes design guidelines and requirements
based on the principle of equality for people with disabilities. Compliance with the
building code thus does not mean compliance with ADA, and vice versa. ADA is
the national accessibility code, and as with the building code, jurisdictions have
interpretations of the guidelines that are specic to the governing municipality. It is
reasonable to assume that these guidelines are written for public facilities and not
for private use.
The terminology of the building code and accessibility guidelines are not always the
same. While interpreting a code or guideline, it is important to reference the correct
denitions.
KEY TERMS AS DEFINED BY ADA
Access Aisle: Accessible pedestrian space
between elements such as parking spaces,
seating, or desks that provides appropriate
clearances per the ADA guidelines.
Accessible: Site, building, facility, or portion
thereof that complies with the ADA guide-
lines and that can be approached, entered,
and used by persons with disabilities.
Accessible Route: Continuous, unobstructed
path connecting all accessible elements and
spaces within or between buildings or facili-
ties. Interior accessible routes may include
corridors, oors, ramps, elevators, lifts, and
clear oor space at xtures.
Accessible Space: Space that complies with
ADA regulations and can be used by persons
with disabilities.
Adaptability: Ability of certain buildings,
spaces, and elements (e.g., kitchen coun-
ters, sinks, grab bars) to be added to or
altered so as to accommodate the needs of
persons with or without disabilities or with
different types of degrees of disability.
Adaptable:
sible to, functional for, and safe for use by
persons with disabilities without structural
change.
Area of Rescue Assistance:
access to an exit, where people who cannot
use stairs may remain temporarily in safety
to await further instructions or assistance
during an emergency evacuation.
Automatic Door:
power-operated mechanism and controls
that open and close the door automatically.
The switch that begins the automatic cycle
may be a photoelectric device, oor mat, or
manual switch.
Bathroom:
spaces that contain a toilet, sink, and bath-
tub or shower.
Change of Use:
from a private to a public one.
Clear:
Clear Floor Space:
oor or ground space required to accom-
modate a single, stationary wheelchair and
occupant. Unless otherwise stated, the
dimensions of clear oor space shall be
by
Common Use:
exterior rooms, spaces, or elements that are
made available for the use of a restricted
group of people.
Detectable Warning:
feature built into or applied to walking sur-
Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:112
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112-133_30056.indd 112 3/4/13 7:34 PM

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