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The Inverted Classroom Model

Book Description

Only two years after its first run, the Inverted Classroom Conference has become a familiar event at Marburg University. Most conference participants not only knew about this digital teaching and learning scenario but were experienced users and developers. While during its predecessors most participants wanted to familiarize themselves with the central components of the Inverted Classroom Model, the focus of the 3rd German Inverted Classroom Conference in 2014, to which this conference volume is dedicated, was not only a discussion of variants of the model but also, for the first time, the inclusion of long-term evaluations and aspects of student behavior.
This shift of emphasis is reflected in the contributions to this volume. Even though all central aspects of the ICM - content production and delivery, testing, and the in-class phase - are still addressed, we can now find recommendations concerning digital material acquisition, in-class tuition, the role of student tutors as well as first long-term studies about ICM effects.
In general then, the focus was much wider than that of the first two ICM-conferences: from a new and originally non-familiar teaching and learning scenario to more general aspects of digitization of teaching and learning in the 21st century.

Table of Contents

  1. Also of Interest
  2. Title Page
  3. Editors
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Table of Contents
  6. Preface
  7. The Authors
  8. I Evaluation and Empirical Evidence of ICM Implementation
    1. 1 The Instructor as Navigator: Empirical Evidence of the Implementation of the ICM at HAW Hamburg
      1. 1.1 Introduction
      2. 1.2 Initial situation
      3. 1.3 Development of a new concept
      4. 1.4 Content production and distribution and organisation of in-class activities
      5. 1.5 Collection of empirical information
      6. 1.6 Empirical analysis and discussion
        1. 1.6.1 Hypothesis 1
        2. 1.6.2 Hypothesis 2
        3. 1.6.3 Hypothesis 3
        4. 1.6.4 Hypothesis 4
        5. 1.6.5 Conclusion
      7. 1.7 Critical acclaim and outlook
      8. 1.8 References
    2. 2 The Inverted Classroom Mastery Model – A Diary Study
      1. 2.1 Introduction
      2. 2.2 The Inverted Classroom Mastery Model (ICMM)
        1. 2.2.1 Phase I – Content delivery and content acquisition
        2. 2.2.2 Phase II – On-Campus
        3. 2.2.3 Phase II – MOOC
      3. 2.3 Evaluation – The diary study
        1. 2.3.1 Winter Term 2013/14: Introduction to Linguistics
          1. 2.3.1.1 Preliminaries
          2. 2.3.1.2 The first unit
          3. 2.3.1.3 Participation and mastery
          4. 2.3.1.4 Final results
          5. 2.3.1.5 Exams and grading
          6. 2.3.1.6 Student opinions
        2. 2.3.2 Summer term 2014: Morphology and Syntax
          1. 2.3.2.1 Preliminaries
          2. 2.3.2.2 The first unit
          3. 2.3.2.3 Participation and mastery
          4. 2.3.2.4 Exams and grading
        3. 2.3.3 Spring 2014: MOOC Linguistics 201
          1. 2.3.3.1 Preliminaries
          2. 2.3.3.2 Participation and mastery
          3. 2.3.3.3 Certification
      4. 2.4 Summary
      5. 2.5 References
  9. II Recent Developments
    1. 3 Student Tutors in ICMM Courses in Academic Teaching: First Experiences
      1. 3.1 The Inverted Classroom Mastery Model
      2. 3.2 The two phases of the ICMM
      3. 3.3 The role of the tutors in the ICMM
      4. 3.4 Tutors beyond the classroom
      5. 3.5 Outcomes and consequences
      6. 3.6 References
    2. 4 Tutors in the ICMM: A Way to Professionalized Tutor Selection and Quality Assurance – First Observations
      1. 4.1 Utilizing tutors in the ICMM
      2. 4.2 Tasks, problems and resulting requirements
        1. 4.2.1 Administrative and counseling tasks
          1. 4.2.1.1 Problems & resulting requirements
        2. 4.2.2 Tasks prior to the in-class meetings: Preparation
          1. 4.2.2.1 Problems & resulting requirements
        3. 4.2.3 Tasks during the in-class sessions
          1. 4.2.3.1 Problems & resulting requirements
        4. 4.2.4 Tasks following the in-class meetings: Post-processing
          1. 4.2.4.1 Problems and resulting requirements
      3. 4.3 Selection process and assessment methods
      4. 4.4 Quality assurance
      5. 4.5 Conclusion and outlook
      6. 4.6 References
    3. 5 Establishment of Structured Comments and Coherent Dialogues Referring to Educational Videos on YouTube
      1. 5.1 Using educational videos in ICM-based teaching and learning settings
      2. 5.2 Coherence and multiple threading in computer mediated communication
      3. 5.3 Discussing educational videos on YouTube – needs and problems
      4. 5.4 The platform Studystar: features and functioning
      5. 5.5 Conclusion
      6. 5.6 References
  10. III Implementations of the ICM at University Level
    1. 6 Improvement of Self-directed Learning by Using the Inverted Classroom Model (ICM) for a Basic Module in Business Computer Sciences
      1. 6.1 Introduction
      2. 6.2 Introduction to the Inverted Classroom Model (ICM)
      3. 6.3 ‘Computer Networks’ - A fundamental module in Business Computer Sciences
      4. 6.4 A new didactical concept
        1. 6.4.1 The content preparation process of Video Learning Nuggets
        2. 6.4.2 Active seminar – An added value lesson
        3. 6.4.3 A change of roles – From lecturer to learning guide
      5. 6.5 Reflection and first lessons learned
      6. 6.6 References
    2. 7 Blending Service Learning and E-Learning Elements in Higher Education: Experiences with a Variation of the Inverted Classroom Model
      1. 7.1 Enriching Service Learning with digital media
      2. 7.2 Web-based dissemination of course relevant knowledge
      3. 7.3 Web-based formation of student teams
      4. 7.4 Supporting students face-to-face in Blended Service Learning
      5. 7.5 Assessment of student learning
      6. 7.6 Conclusion
      7. 7.7 References
    3. 8 The Inverted Classroom Model in Law Studies
      1. 8.1 Introduction
        1. 8.1.1 Initial situation
        2. 8.1.2 Previous use of new media in law studies
        3. 8.1.3 Motivation and ambitions
      2. 8.2 ICM in law studies
        1. 8.2.1 Concept design
        2. 8.2.2 Reorganization of content and structuring
      3. 8.3 Weekly schedule
        1. 8.3.1 The preparation phase
          1. 8.3.1.1 Lecture recording
          2. 8.3.1.2 Podcasting
          3. 8.3.1.3 Formative assessment
          4. 8.3.1.4 Learning material
        2. 8.3.2 The presence phase
        3. 8.3.3 The post-processing phase
          1. 8.3.3.1 Online meeting
          2. 8.3.3.2 Hand-in exercises
          3. 8.3.3.3 Q&A in the Stud.IP discussion board
      4. 8.4 Evaluation results
      5. 8.5 Conclusion and perspectives
      6. 8.6 References
  11. IV Implementation of the ICM in High School
    1. 9 Increasing Learner Activity in the First ICMM Phase: a First-Hand Report
      1. 9.1 Introduction
      2. 9.2 Basic information about the pupils and the setting
      3. 9.3 The development of self-study material
      4. 9.4 Conclusion
      5. 9.5 References
  12. References
  13. Index