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The Invisible Cryptologists: African-Americans, WWII to 1956 by Jeannette Williams

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Epilogue

 

I was so involved in what the Agency stood for, and I wanted it to be better. I had a feeling that things were going to get better. Everybody in there was not evil. I felt that one day African-Americans would break out of this box and be able to go into reporting or personnel or other areas, if they were prepared. I preached – be prepared.

 
 --Iris Carr, 30 June 1999

In 1956, as part of a major Agency reorganization, NSA-63, the successor to AFSA-213 and AFSA-211 (another receipt and distribution unit with a high percentage of African-Americans), was dissolved. Many blacks, particularly the tape printers, moved to the new collection organization where they continued to perform the tasks of receiving, converting, and distributing intercept ...

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