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(Fogra 39) Job:02-28051 Title:RP-Textile Artist Handbook
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The TexT ile ArT isT 's sTudio hAndbook
70
In contrast to processes such as knitting and
crochet that use one continuous thread, weav-
ing uses two sets of thread interlaced at perpen-
dicular angles to create a grid. Woven fabrics are
classified by the manner in which warp (the verti-
cal threads that are woven into) and weft (the hori-
zontal threads being woven) threads cross each
other. There are three fundamental weaves with
many variations of each; they are the plain, twill,
and satin weaves. They all involve the same basic
steps:
1. Raising alternating warp threads to create an
opening called the shed, through which the
weft threads can pass
2. Using a shuttle (page 76) to pass the weft into
and through the shed
3. Lowering the shed
4. Battening the weft, row by row, to form fabric
Weaving
In this chapter, we’ve compiled lists of the
important vocabulary terms and tools, we’ve de-
scribed and illustrated the parts of a loom, and
we’ll take you through each step of the weaving
process. Though setup can be laborious, the pro-
cess of weaving is extremely meditative and satis-
fying … but its not for the faint of heart!
5
chapter
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The TexT ile ArT isT 's sTudio hAndbook
71
A Brief History of Weaving
As people started farming and domesticating animals
during the Neolithic period, plant and animal fiber be-
came available for spinning yarn. Weaving tools such
as the vertical weighted loom were developed from
the practice of hanging warp threads from a tree and
holding them taut to the ground with stones. The Back
Strap Loom, which is still widely used across South
and Central America, allows the weaver to travel with
the loom. The warp threads are tied at one end to a
stationary object and the other end to the weaver’s
body in order to create and control tension.
ABOVE In South America, back
strap weaving is still used widely.
Shown here is a woman in a commu-
nity in Patacancha, Peru. She works
as part of a new collective with the
Awamaki Organization.
Photo: Kate Reeder
RIGHT On an 8-harness floor loom
such as the Harrisville shown here,
you can create simple or highly
complex woven fabrics.
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