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Trigonometry For Dummies, 2nd Edition by Mary Jane Sterling

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Chapter 10

Applying Yourself to Trig Functions

In This Chapter

arrow Recognizing angles of elevation and depression

arrow Determining heights of buildings

arrow Calculating the slope of a hill

arrow Measuring when objects are really high up

arrow Dealing with odd shapes and distances

Back when trig functions were first developed or recognized — way back when — the motivation for creating the functions wasn't so men could sit around and say, “Hey, Caesar, did you know that the sine of 45 degrees is 9781118827413-eq10001.tif?”

Instead, the math gurus of the past worked out the principles of trigonometry because they needed some order or consistency to the numbers that they were applying to astronomy, agriculture, and architecture. They figured out the relationships among all these numbers and shared them with the rest of the known, civilized world.

First Things First: Elevating and Depressing

Mathematical problems that require the use of ...

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