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Using SANs and NAS by W. Curtis Preston

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Access to Storage Resources

If all your SAN devices are functioning properly, you will be spending much of your SAN management time allocating storage resources and giving access to them. First, you will create virtual disk and tape devices through a process called virtualization . Second, you will create zones or use LUN masking to create data paths between the virtual storage resources and the servers that need them. Third, you can use persistent binding to create a permanent relationship between each virtual resource and a SCSI ID on a server. Finally, you use multipathing software to take advantage of the multiple physical paths between each storage resource and each server.

Storage Virtualization

A SAN may consist of hundreds or thousands of physical disks inside one or more storage arrays, and many tape drives inside one or more tape libraries. The first task of the SAN administrator is to turn these physical resources into virtual ones that may be used by the servers. This is done by dividing a single physical resource into multiple resources (i.e., slicing), or by aggregating many physical resources into one virtual resource (i.e., striping/RAID ). There isn't much to do with tape libraries, because you can't create slices of a tape drive or stripe many tape drives together.[1] However, with disk arrays, there's quite a bit of work to do, and the virtualization of disk storage can take place on either the storage array or the server level.

Slicing

All storage consists ...

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