Using the "Narcotrafico" Threat to Build Public Administration Capacity between the US and Mexico

Book description

The current drug trafficking crisis between the US and Mexico is a "perfect storm" that has caused deaths, disappearances, and widespread fear of violence and insecurity in the border area between these two countries. Current US drug control policies with Mexico are based on a militarized system of border control and characterized by domestic gridlock over drug control and immigration reform. However, because drug trafficking and other underlying issues have both domestic and international consequences, they cannot be resolved unless both countries work together. Using the "Narcotrafico" Threat to Build Public Administration Capacity between the US and Mexico explores how they can do exactly that.

Co-edited by two public administration scholars from Mexico and the US and comprising chapters by 18 other experts from Mexico, Canada, and the US, the book demonstrates how the current situation of drug trafficking and violence, on top of the other existing perceptions and conditions, creates a real opportunity for the US to build relationships with its Mexican counterparts at state, local, national, and NGO levels. With chapters written by leading experts working in a broad spectrum of international and domestic US-Mexico policy issues, the book covers immigration, drug flow and conflict, gun-running, money laundering, education and economic and community development in both countries..

Only by supporting bi-national drug policies based on mutual understanding of the border as something that both separates and unites the US and Mexico will it be possible to develop cooperative policies that can lead from militarization to regularization of the US-Mexico border. Twenty years after the signing of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) in 1994, it is time to recognize the link between effective drug control policies and the emergence of North America as a regional economic, social, and political powerhouse capable of successfully competing with the European Union, China, and other emerging regions in our increasingly globalized world, this book offers concrete, long-term solutions for building cooperative and shared public administrative capacity on both sides of the border.

Table of contents

  1. Front Cover (1/2)
  2. Front Cover (2/2)
  3. Contents
  4. Preface
  5. Acknowledgments
  6. Editors
  7. Contributors (1/2)
  8. Contributors (2/2)
  9. Chapter 1: The “Perfect Storm”: Drug Trafficking in the Mexico–U.S. Trans-Border Region as an Unrecognized Opportunity to Strengthen Public Administration (1/4)
  10. Chapter 1: The “Perfect Storm”: Drug Trafficking in the Mexico–U.S. Trans-Border Region as an Unrecognized Opportunity to Strengthen Public Administration (2/4)
  11. Chapter 1: The “Perfect Storm”: Drug Trafficking in the Mexico–U.S. Trans-Border Region as an Unrecognized Opportunity to Strengthen Public Administration (3/4)
  12. Chapter 1: The “Perfect Storm”: Drug Trafficking in the Mexico–U.S. Trans-Border Region as an Unrecognized Opportunity to Strengthen Public Administration (4/4)
  13. Chapter 2: Drug Trafficking and Public Administration: A Natural Relationship and a Global Problem (1/4)
  14. Chapter 2: Drug Trafficking and Public Administration: A Natural Relationship and a Global Problem (2/4)
  15. Chapter 2: Drug Trafficking and Public Administration: A Natural Relationship and a Global Problem (3/4)
  16. Chapter 2: Drug Trafficking and Public Administration: A Natural Relationship and a Global Problem (4/4)
  17. Chapter 3: Regional Development, Education, and Trans-Border Governance: Toward the Creation of a True Economic and Social Community (1/3)
  18. Chapter 3: Regional Development, Education, and Trans-Border Governance: Toward the Creation of a True Economic and Social Community (2/3)
  19. Chapter 3: Regional Development, Education, and Trans-Border Governance: Toward the Creation of a True Economic and Social Community (3/3)
  20. Chapter 4: Looks of Fear: A Reflection of Violence and Crime in Mexico (1/3)
  21. Chapter 4: Looks of Fear: A Reflection of Violence and Crime in Mexico (2/3)
  22. Chapter 4: Looks of Fear: A Reflection of Violence and Crime in Mexico (3/3)
  23. Chapter 5: A High-Risk Profession: Risks and Costs for Mexican Democracy of Journalists in the Middle of the War against Drug Trafficking (1/4)
  24. Chapter 5: A High-Risk Profession: Risks and Costs for Mexican Democracy of Journalists in the Middle of the War against Drug Trafficking (2/4)
  25. Chapter 5: A High-Risk Profession: Risks and Costs for Mexican Democracy of Journalists in the Middle of the War against Drug Trafficking (3/4)
  26. Chapter 5: A High-Risk Profession: Risks and Costs for Mexican Democracy of Journalists in the Middle of the War against Drug Trafficking (4/4)
  27. Chapter 6: The Military in the Homeland: Comparing the United States and Mexico (1/4)
  28. Chapter 6: The Military in the Homeland: Comparing the United States and Mexico (2/4)
  29. Chapter 6: The Military in the Homeland: Comparing the United States and Mexico (3/4)
  30. Chapter 6: The Military in the Homeland: Comparing the United States and Mexico (4/4)
  31. Chapter 7: Institutional Capacity and National Security Policy in Mexico: From Formalism to Realism (1/5)
  32. Chapter 7: Institutional Capacity and National Security Policy in Mexico: From Formalism to Realism (2/5)
  33. Chapter 7: Institutional Capacity and National Security Policy in Mexico: From Formalism to Realism (3/5)
  34. Chapter 7: Institutional Capacity and National Security Policy in Mexico: From Formalism to Realism (4/5)
  35. Chapter 7: Institutional Capacity and National Security Policy in Mexico: From Formalism to Realism (5/5)
  36. Chapter 8: Critically Low Hispanic College Graduation Rates and a Clear Absence of Hispanic High-Level Administrators in Arizona, California, and Texas (1/5)
  37. Chapter 8: Critically Low Hispanic College Graduation Rates and a Clear Absence of Hispanic High-Level Administrators in Arizona, California, and Texas (2/5)
  38. Chapter 8: Critically Low Hispanic College Graduation Rates and a Clear Absence of Hispanic High-Level Administrators in Arizona, California, and Texas (3/5)
  39. Chapter 8: Critically Low Hispanic College Graduation Rates and a Clear Absence of Hispanic High-Level Administrators in Arizona, California, and Texas (4/5)
  40. Chapter 8: Critically Low Hispanic College Graduation Rates and a Clear Absence of Hispanic High-Level Administrators in Arizona, California, and Texas (5/5)
  41. Chapter 9: The Frontier of Knowledge: Between Life and Death (1/5)
  42. Chapter 9: The Frontier of Knowledge: Between Life and Death (2/5)
  43. Chapter 9: The Frontier of Knowledge: Between Life and Death (3/5)
  44. Chapter 9: The Frontier of Knowledge: Between Life and Death (4/5)
  45. Chapter 9: The Frontier of Knowledge: Between Life and Death (5/5)
  46. Chapter 10: How Cartel Violence Is Affecting Cross-Border Collaboration (1/4)
  47. Chapter 10: How Cartel Violence Is Affecting Cross-Border Collaboration (2/4)
  48. Chapter 10: How Cartel Violence Is Affecting Cross-Border Collaboration (3/4)
  49. Chapter 10: How Cartel Violence Is Affecting Cross-Border Collaboration (4/4)
  50. Chapter 11: The U.S.–Mexico Border in the Making of Bilateral Policy (1/3)
  51. Chapter 11: The U.S.–Mexico Border in the Making of Bilateral Policy (2/3)
  52. Chapter 11: The U.S.–Mexico Border in the Making of Bilateral Policy (3/3)
  53. Chapter 12: Civil Service: A Critical Feature of Stability for Reducing Corruption in a Country Such as Mexico? (1/4)
  54. Chapter 12: Civil Service: A Critical Feature of Stability for Reducing Corruption in a Country Such as Mexico? (2/4)
  55. Chapter 12: Civil Service: A Critical Feature of Stability for Reducing Corruption in a Country Such as Mexico? (3/4)
  56. Chapter 12: Civil Service: A Critical Feature of Stability for Reducing Corruption in a Country Such as Mexico? (4/4)
  57. Chapter 13: Latin American States and the Imperatives of Unfinished Modernity: State Crisis and Public Security in Mexico (1/3)
  58. Chapter 13: Latin American States and the Imperatives of Unfinished Modernity: State Crisis and Public Security in Mexico (2/3)
  59. Chapter 13: Latin American States and the Imperatives of Unfinished Modernity: State Crisis and Public Security in Mexico (3/3)
  60. Chapter 14: Publicness and Governance (1/4)
  61. Chapter 14: Publicness and Governance (2/4)
  62. Chapter 14: Publicness and Governance (3/4)
  63. Chapter 14: Publicness and Governance (4/4)
  64. Chapter 15: Analysis, Conclusions, and Final Considerations (1/3)
  65. Chapter 15: Analysis, Conclusions, and Final Considerations (2/3)
  66. Chapter 15: Analysis, Conclusions, and Final Considerations (3/3)
  67. Back Cover

Product information

  • Title: Using the "Narcotrafico" Threat to Build Public Administration Capacity between the US and Mexico
  • Author(s): Donald E. Klingner, Roberto Moreno Espinosa
  • Release date: February 2014
  • Publisher(s): CRC Press
  • ISBN: 9781466571105