35
Chapter 3
Regional Development,
Education, and Trans-
Border Governance
Toward the Creation of a
TrueEconomic and Social
Community
Angélica Pérez Ordaz
e best way for two neighbors to approach each other is through
mutual understanding.*
Daniel Cosio Villegas
*
Taken from Krauze (2003, p. 14).
Contents
Introduction ........................................................................................................36
e Meaning of the Border: Demographic Trends, Economic Imperatives ..........37
A Shared Opportunity for Economic Development and Public Education
Policy in the Trans-Border Region .......................................................................39
Conclusion ..........................................................................................................43
References .......................................................................................................... 44
36 ◾  Using the “Narcotrafico” Threat to Build Public Administration
Introduction
e United States Mexico border region is a shared space with peculiar features
and common dynamics that transcend both countries’ geopolitical boundaries. In
this shared space, education has become a critical element in the context of a more
globalized economy where better-trained citizens can respond more proactively and
effectively to the challenges and opportunities created by greater global economic
integration. Education is one of the main engines of economic growth and social
development, promoting productivity and competitiveness of any region or country.
Around the world, it is essential that countries move toward the creation of true
economic and social communities that transcend nationalism, xenophobia, and
ethnic conflicts marked by intolerance, religious fundamentalism, and other mech-
anisms of exclusion. Education can become the key instrument for understand-
ing these problems and providing solutions to them. Only education can provide
every citizen with the essential elements needed to understand and act in society,
to change as the world changes, not as a reactive adaptation to the present but in
anticipation of the future. It is a vital element to facilitate first the engagement and
then the integration into society of all citizens excluded from the benefits of devel-
opment. Education leads to individual creativity and improves participation in the
social, economic, cultural, and political life of communities. And apart from its
economic value for society education is also a basic human right. It is not enough
to ensure a certain level of education for all citizens, or to consider it as a process
that ends at a certain age. Since no nation can aspire to competitiveness without
exploiting the potential of the most precious resource (i.e., human capital), public
authorities should promote education that will last a lifetime (Urzúa et al., 1995).
e second half of the twentieth century witnessed the rebuilding of educational
systems around the world as the result of the underlying social, economic, political,
and cultural transformations that followed the end of the 1970s, marked by the demise
of the welfare state and the end of an era of unprecedented prosperity (Pérez Ordaz
2009). e development of science and technology transformed all countries, bringing
new forms of social organization, increased economic competition, and greater differ-
entiation between rich and poor countries, a new world map, and a new international
order with capitalism established as the dominant economic system. After the fall of
the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the former Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s,
the United States became the worlds major country due to its economic, political, and
military power as well as its cultural influence. is has mainly been due to the human
capital that has been the engine of its economy (Schiller, 2008), from its establishment
as an independent nation to its history of large-scale immigration that characterizes it
as one of the ethnically most diverse and multicultural nations of the world.
is new global order is driven by the diusion and adoption of new knowl-
edge and innovative technologies of information and communications technologies
(ICTs), biotechnology, and nanotechnology. ese in turn drive the demand for
increasingly globalized educational models open to evaluation and modification. e

Get Using the "Narcotrafico" Threat to Build Public Administration Capacity between the US and Mexico now with O’Reilly online learning.

O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers.