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Visual C#® 2012: How to Program, Fifth Edition by Harvey Deitel, Paul Deitel

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8.8. Passing Arrays by Value and by Reference

In C#, a variable that “stores” an object, such as an array, does not actually store the object itself. Instead, such a variable stores a reference to the object. The distinction between reference-type variables and value-type variables raises some subtle issues that you must understand to create secure, stable programs.

As you know, when an app passes an argument to a method, the called method receives a copy of that argument’s value. Changes to the local copy in the called method do not affect the original variable in the caller. If the argument is of a reference type, the method makes a copy of the reference, not a copy of the actual object that’s referenced. The local copy of the reference also ...

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