Voice Over IPv6

Book Description

IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) is the future of Internet telephony. And this book is your guide to that future.

IPv6 is the replacement for the currently used IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4). IPv6 will offer increased IP addresses (full 128-bit addresses, compared to the 32-bit addresses of IPv4), enhanced security, and greater robustness. It will also be fully “backwards compatible” with existing IPv4 systems. These capabilities will finally make Internet telephony a viable competitor to conventional switched telephone networks. In this book, Dan Minoli clearly explains IPv6 and how telephone networks can be built on its foundations.

This is not just another IPv6 book; instead, it focuses on those aspects of IPv6 relevant to Internet telephony systems and voice networks. Minoli uses a compare/contrast approach, exploring where IPv6 is similar to IPv4 and where it differs, to let you quickly grasp the essence of IPv6 and the similarities (and differences) between current IPv4-based systems and IPv6-based systems.

If you will be designing, implementing, or maintaining the next generation of Internet telephony systems, then you need the information in this book!

*Explains the essential concepts of IPv6 and how they relate to Internet telephony
*Describes how Internet telephony systems using IPv6 are different from, and better than, Internet telephony systems based on the older IPv4 standard
*Discusses how to transition existing IPv4 Internet telephony systems and conventional switched systems to IPv6-based systems
*Extensive treatment of security issues, including IP layer encryption and authentication methods
*Explains connection techniques, including “plug and play” approaches, for equipment used in IPv6 systems

* The first title describing how the next generation Internet protocol—IPv6—can be used for Internet telephony
* Explains IPv6 as it applies to Internet telephony (VoIP)
* Shows how IPv6 gives better security, QoS, and signal integrity in Internet telephony

Table of Contents

  1. front cover
  2. copyright
  3. table of contents
  4. front matter
  5. Preface
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. body
  8. 1 Introduction
    1. 1.1 Overview
    2. 1.2 Introductory Overview of IPv6
      1. 1.2.1 IPv6 Benefits
      2. 1.2.2 Network Address Translation Issues in IPv4
      3. 1.2.3 IPv6 Address Space
      4. 1.2.4 Basic Protocol Constructs
      5. 1.2.5 IPv6 Autoconfiguration
      6. 1.2.6 Applications
      7. 1.2.7 Transition Approaches
    3. 1.3 Introductory Overview of VoIP
      1. 1.3.1 Overview
      2. 1.3.2 First-Generation 1G VoIP Networks
      3. 1.3.3 Second-Generation 2G VoIP Networks
      4. 1.3.4 Pragmatic Enterprise 2G VoIP Deployment Approaches
      5. 1.3.5 2G VoIP Trunking Only
      6. 1.3.6 2G Traditional PBXs with IP Adjunct Extensions (Enhancements)
      7. 1.3.7 2G Hybrid TDM and IP Systems
      8. 1.3.8 2G Pure IP Server-Based Telephony Systems
      9. 1.3.9 Possible Evolution Paths for 2G Deployments
    4. 1.4 Third-Generation 3G VoIP Networks
    5. 1.5 Deployment/Penetration Issues
    6. 1.6 Line of Investigation
    7. Appendix A: Basic IPv6 Terminology (1/2)
    8. Appendix A: Basic IPv6 Terminology (2/2)
    9. Appendix B: Basic Bibliography (1/2)
    10. Appendix B: Basic Bibliography (2/2)
  9. 2 Basic VoP/VoIP Concepts
    1. 2.1 Introduction and Background
      1. 2.1.1 Carriers' Voice Networks
      2. 2.1.2 VoIP in Cable TV Environments
    2. 2.2 Voice Digitization and Encoding
      1. 2.2.1 Overview of Speech Encoding Methods (1/3)
      2. 2.2.1 Overview of Speech Encoding Methods (2/3)
      3. 2.2.1 Overview of Speech Encoding Methods (3/3)
      4. 2.2.2 Technology and Standards for Low Bit Rate Vocoding Methods (1/2)
      5. 2.2.2 Technology and Standards for Low Bit Rate Vocoding Methods (2/2)
    3. 2.3 Signaling
      1. 2.3.1 H.323 Standards
      2. 2.3.2 Introduction to Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
      3. 2.3.3 MEGACO
    4. 2.4 Numbering
    5. 2.5 VoIP and Wireless Networks
      1. 2.5.1 Approaches
      2. 2.5.2 Wireless VoIP Service Offering Dynamics
      3. 2.5.3 Wireless Summary
    6. 2.6 Conclusion
  10. 3 Basic VoIP Signaling and SIP Concepts
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Overview
    3. 3.3 Fundamental SIP Functionality
    4. 3.4 Overview of Operation
    5. 3.5 Structure of the Protocol
    6. 3.6 SIP Details
    7. Appendix A
    8. A.1 Definitions
    9. A.2 SIP Messages
      1. A.2.1 Requests
      2. A.2.2 Responses
      3. A.2.3 Header Fields
      4. A.2.4 Bodies
      5. A.2.5 Framing SIP Messages
    10. A.3 General User Agent Behavior
      1. A.3.1 UAC Behavior (1/2)
      2. A.3.1 UAC Behavior (2/2)
      3. A.3.2 UAS Behavior
      4. A.3.3 Redirect Servers
    11. A.4 Canceling a Request
      1. A.4.1 Client Behavior
      2. A.4.2 Server Behavior
    12. A.5 Registrations
      1. A.5.1 Overview
      2. A.5.2 Constructing the REGISTER Request
      3. A.5.3 Processing REGISTER Requests
    13. A.6 Querying for Capabilities
      1. A.6.1 Construction of OPTIONS Request
      2. A.6.2 Processing of OPTIONS Request
    14. A.7 Dialogs
      1. A.7.1 Creation of a Dialog
      2. A.7.2 Requests within a Dialog
      3. A.7.3 Termination of a Dialog
    15. A.8 Initiating a Session
      1. A.8.1 Overview
      2. A.8.2 UAC Processing
      3. A.8.3 UAS Processing
    16. A.9 Modifying an Existing Session
      1. A.9.1 UAC Behavior
      2. A.9.2 UAS Behavior
    17. A.10 Terminating a Session
      1. A.10.1 Terminating a Session with a BYE Request
    18. A.11 Proxy Behavior
      1. A.11.1 Overview
      2. A.11.2 Stateful Proxy
      3. A.11.3 Summary of Proxy Route Processing
    19. A.12 Transactions
      1. A.12.1 Client Transaction
      2. A.12.2 Server Transaction
    20. A.13 Transport
      1. A.13.1 Clients
      2. A.13.2 Servers
      3. A.13.3 Framing
      4. A.13.4 Error Handling
    21. A.14 Additional Details
  11. 4 Basic “Presence” Concepts
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Abstract Model for a Presence and Instant Messaging
      1. 4.2.1 Introduction
      2. 4.2.2 Overview
      3. 4.2.3 Model
    3. 4.3 Instant Messaging/Presence Protocol Requirements
      1. 4.3.1 Machinery
      2. 4.3.2 Shared Requirements
      3. 4.3.3 Additional Requirements for PRESENCE INFORMATION
      4. 4.3.4 Additional Requirements for INSTANT MESSAGES
    4. 4.4 SIP Applications
      1. 4.4.1 Introduction
      2. 4.4.2 Terminology
      3. 4.4.3 Definitions
      4. 4.4.4 Overview of Operation
      5. 4.4.5 Usage of Presence URIs
      6. 4.4.6 Presence Event Package
      7. 4.4.7 Learning Presence State
      8. 4.4.8 Example Message Flow
    5. 4.5 Conclusion
  12. 5 Issues with Current VoIP Technologies
    1. 5.1 General Enterprise Security Issues
      1. 5.1.1 Typical Enterprise Network Approaches (1/2)
      2. 5.1.1 Typical Enterprise Network Approaches (2/2)
      3. 5.1.2 Typical Enterprise Network VoIP Security/Integration Approaches
      4. 5.1.3 Firewall Issues for VoIP
    2. 5.2 What is NAT?
      1. 5.2.1 Introduction
      2. 5.2.2 Overview of Traditional NAT
      3. 5.2.3 Translation Phases of a Session
      4. 5.2.4 Packet Translations
      5. 5.2.5 Miscellaneous Issues
      6. 5.2.6 NAT Limitations
    3. 5.3 STUN-Simple Traversal of User Datagram Protocol (UDP) Through Network Address Translators (NATs)
      1. 5.3.1 Applicability Statement
      2. 5.3.2 Introduction
      3. 5.3.3 Applicability to VoIP
      4. 5.3.4 Definitions
      5. 5.3.5 NAT Variations
      6. 5.3.6 Overview of Operation
      7. 5.3.7 Message Overview
      8. 5.3.8 Server Behavior
      9. 5.3.9 Client Behavior (1/2)
      10. 5.3.9 Client Behavior (2/2)
      11. 5.3.11 Protocol Details
    4. 5.4 Overview of MIDCOM Approaches
      1. 5.4.1 Background
      2. 5.4.2 Terminology
      3. 5.4.3 Architectural Framework for Middleboxes
      4. 5.4.4 MIDCOM Protocol
      5. 5.4.5 MIDCOM Agents
      6. 5.4.6 MIDCOM PDP Functions
      7. 5.4.7 MIDCOM Framework Illustration Using an In-Path Agent (1/2)
      8. 5.4.7 MIDCOM Framework Illustration Using an In-Path Agent (2/2)
      9. 5.4.8 Operational Considerations
      10. 5.4.9 Applicability Statement
    5. 5.5 Pragmatic Approaches using SIP Border Gateways (1/2)
    6. 5.5 Pragmatic Approaches using SIP Border Gateways (2/2)
  13. 6 Basic IPv6 Concepts
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Terminology
    3. 6.3 IPv6 Header Format
    4. 6.4 IPv6 Extension Headers
      1. 6.4.1 Extension Header Order
      2. 6.4.2 Options
      3. 6.4.3 Hop-by-Hop Options Header
      4. 6.4.4 Routing Header
      5. 6.4.5 Fragment Header
      6. 6.4.6 Destination Options Header
      7. 6.4.7 No Next Header
    5. 6.5 Packet Size Issues
    6. 6.6 Flow Labels
    7. 6.7 Traffic Classes
    8. 6.8 Upper-Layer Protocol Issues
      1. 6.8.1 Upper-Layer Checksums
      2. 6.8.2 Maximum Packet Lifetime
      3. 6.8.3 Maximum Upper-Layer Payload Size
      4. 6.8.4 Responding to Packets Carrying Routing Headers
    9. 6.9 Semantics and Usage of the Flow Label Field
    10. 6.10 Formatting Guidelines for Options
    11. 6.11 Introduction to Addressing
    12. 6.12 IPv6 Addressing
      1. 6.12.1 Addressing Model
      2. 6.12.2 Text Representation of Addresses
      3. 6.12.3 Text Representation of Address Prefixes
      4. 6.12.4 Address Type Identification
      5. 6.12.5 Unicast Addresses
      6. 6.12.6 Anycast Addresses
      7. 6.12.7 Multicast Addresses
      8. 6.12.8 A NodeÌs Required Addresses
    13. 6.13 IANA Considerations
    14. 6.14 Creating Modified EUI-64 Format Interface Identifiers
    15. 6.15 64-Bit Global Identifier (EUI-64) Registration Authority
    16. 6.16 Additional Technical Details
  14. 7 Using IPv6 to Support 3G VoIP
    1. 7.1 Overview of VoIPv6 Positioning
    2. 7.2 IPv6 Infrastructure
      1. 7.2.1 Protocol Mechanisms
      2. 7.2.2 Protocol-Support Mechanisms
    3. 7.3 IPv6 Addressing Mechanisms
      1. 7.3.1 Conventions
      2. 7.3.2 Addressing issues/reachability
      3. 7.3.3 Scope/Reachability
      4. 7.3.4 Address Types
      5. 7.3.5 Addresses for Hosts and Routers
    4. 7.4 Configuration Methods
    5. 7.5 Routing and Route Management
    6. 7.6 Deployment Status
      1. 7.6.1 Deployment Approach
      2. 7.6.2 Network Infrastructure Deployment
      3. 7.6.3 Applications, Middleware and Management for IPv6 Deployment
      4. 7.6.4 Security Deployment and Business Challenge for IPv6
  15. 8 Issues Related to Transitioning to IPv6
    1. 8.1 Introduction
      1. 8.1.1 Terminology
      2. 8.1.2 Approach
    2. 8.2 Dual-IP Layer Operation
      1. 8.2.1 Address Configuration
      2. 8.2.2 Domain Naming System
      3. 8.2.3 Advertising Addresses in the DNS
    3. 8.3 Common Tunneling Mechanisms
      1. 8.3.1 Encapsulation
      2. 8.3.2 Tunnel MTU and Fragmentation
      3. 8.3.3 Hop Limit
      4. 8.3.4 Handling IPv4 ICMP errors
      5. 8.3.5 IPv4 Header Construction
      6. 8.3.6 Decapsulation
      7. 8.3.7 Link-Local Addresses
      8. 8.3.8 Neighbor Discovery over Tunnels
    4. 8.4 Configured Tunneling
      1. 8.4.1 Default Configured Tunnel
      2. 8.4.2 Default Configured Tunnel Using IPv4 "Anycast Address"
      3. 8.4.3 Ingress Filtering
    5. 8.5 Automatic Tunneling
      1. 8.5.1 IPv4-Compatible Address Format
      2. 8.5.2 IPv4-Compatible Address Configuration
      3. 8.5.3 Automatic Tunneling Operation
      4. 8.5.4 Use With Default Configured Tunnels
      5. 8.5.5 Source Address Selection
      6. 8.5.6 Ingress Filtering
    6. 8.6 Application Aspects of IPv6 Transition
      1. 8.6.1 Transition Issues
      2. 8.6.2 Overview of IPv6 Application Transition
      3. 8.6.3 Problems with IPv6 Application Transition
      4. 8.6.4 Description of Transition Scenarios and Guidelines
      5. 8.6.5 Application Porting Considerations
  16. back matter
  17. References
  18. About the Author
  19. Index (1/4)
  20. Index (2/4)
  21. Index (3/4)
  22. Index (4/4)

Product Information

  • Title: Voice Over IPv6
  • Author(s): Daniel Minoli
  • Release date: April 2011
  • Publisher(s): Newnes
  • ISBN: 9780080481654