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What to Do When Things Go Wrong: A Five-Step Guide to Planning for and Surviving the Inevitable—And Coming Out Ahead by Frank Supovitz

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DEFINING DISASTER

Let’s talk about crisis-proofing your project. But, before we do, let’s agree on what a crisis is. Not everything that goes wrong is a crisis, of course, but let’s consider the worst possibilities first, and we can scale down from there. The way I see it, there are four distinct levels of crisis, differentiated by what is truly at stake. Each demands a different level of urgency, focus, and priority of response.

RISK LEVELS

Level 1—Safety and Security Risk

First, do the circumstances put people at risk? When a crisis unfolds, safety should always come first, second, and third. Whenever the potential for physical danger exists, cost considerations should factor well behind. In the event world, safety takes precedence not only ...

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