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Windows 2000 Pro: The Missing Manual by Sharon Crawford

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Using the Address Book

Unless you make a living counting cards at Vegas (and even if you do), you probably can't remember all the email addresses, phone numbers, and addresses in your social and business circles. Fortunately, Outlook Express comes with an Address Book that can store just about every bit of information about a person.

The easiest way to open the Address Book is to click the "To:" or "Cc:" button while composing a message. Doing so opens the Select Recipients dialog box, a streamlined window, onto your Address Book.

The Select Recipients dialog box is useful when sending an email message; but to create new contacts, organize contacts, or look up information other than email addresses, you should use the full Address Book window. To open it, click the Addresses toolbar button in the main Outlook Express window, as shown in Figure 12-7, or choose ToolsAddress Book, or press Ctrl+Shift+B.

On the left is the Folders and Groups pane, which shows your contacts (located in the Main Identity's Contacts folder), along with any groups or subfolders you've created. The right pane lists the contacts in the currently selected folder. Double-click a contact to view or edit the contact's information.

Figure 12-7. On the left is the Folders and Groups pane, which shows your contacts (located in the Main Identity's Contacts folder), along with any groups or subfolders you've created. The right pane lists the contacts in the currently selected folder. Double-click a contact to view or edit the contact's information.

Unfortunately, this feature doesn't always work as well as advertised; it often displays a map showing only the city of your contact. There's hope, however: Outlook 2000 exhibited ...

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