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Windows® Home Server Bible by Jennifer Ackerman Kettell, Greg Kettell

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Chapter 19. Controlling Computers Remotely

In Chapter 18, we showed you how to access your Windows Home Servers shared folders and Web site using the Remote Access feature. While this is indeed a terrific feature to have, there are times when you may need more than this. Suppose you need to access one of your client computers to check your mail, or your server to make changes to backup settings, but you aren't anywhere near your home network. Are you out of luck?

With the computer Remote Access feature, you are not. Using Internet Explorer, you can connect to the server and control the Console remotely, as if you were on your home network. In some cases, you can even connect to your client computers depending on the version of Windows they are running.

In this chapter, we show you how to do both of those things and even more. If you'd like the ability to use Remote Desktop to connect to your server's desktop rather than the Console, we'll show you how to do that. We also show you an alternative that you can use in the event that remote access is not a viable solution for your version of Windows.

About Remote Access to Computers

Remote access to computers makes use of a special Internet Explorer ActiveX control that uses your browser as a host for a Remote Desktop window. This window can be ...

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