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Windows Server® 2008 Administrator’s Companion by Charlie Russel and Sharon Crawford

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Understanding the Registry’s Structure

In a file system, the root objects are disks, which contain folders and files. A single folder can contain an arbitrary number of other folders and files; each folder or file has a name. By combining the names of the folders that enclose a file, you can construct a path that unambiguously names only one file on the disk, so that C:\Windows\system32\Mapi32.dll and C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Mapi32.dll are completely separate files.

The registry is organized much like a file system, except that the vocabulary needed to describe it is somewhat different. At the root of the registry structure are the root keys, which can be likened to a disk in a file system. Each root key contains several subkeys (folders); in turn, ...

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