O'Reilly logo

Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

496
|
Chapter 14: Setting Up Your Network
IPv6 developers also implemented IP Security (IPSec) into the proto-
col. IPSec lies within the IP network layer, and encrypts and authenti-
cates as an integrated part of the protocol by default. This eliminates
additional overhead in encoding and decoding packets using IPSec
functionality.
Configuring the IPv4 and IPv6 Protocols
Each network adapter configured on your computer has a separate IP addressing
configuration, which you can manage through the associated network connection.
The network connection for the first network adapter on the computer is named
Local Area Connection; the second network adapter is named Local Area Connec-
tion 2, and so on. Connections for wireless, dial-up, or broadband have the name
you assigned when you created the connection.
During installation of the operating system, the Setup program automatically
installed the necessary networking components for your computer if a network
adapter was detected. In addition to TCP/IPv4 and TCP/IPv6, Windows Vista uses
the following networking components:
Client for Microsoft Networks
Allows you to connect to Microsoft-based networking services. If you are con-
necting to a Windows domain, you are required to use this protocol.
QoS Packet Scheduler
Offers the capability to define which protocols and applications have prece-
dence in a situation where multiple applications or protocols request access to
the same network resources. This protocol gives you the ability to raise or lower
the priority of the requests made. Basically, the Quality of Service (QoS) Packet
Scheduler works as a traffic cop by allowing you to control the rate of flow and
prioritization of services available.
File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
Allows other computers to connect to and access resources on your computer
when using Microsoft networking protocols. This feature also allows you to
access resources on remote machines connected to your network and on the
Internet.
Table 14-9. IPv6 packet example
Bit 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32
Version Traffic class Flow label
Source address information
Destination address information
Networking with TCP/IP
|
497
Link-Layer Topology Discovery Mapper I/O Driver
Allows your computer to discover and locate other computers and devices on
the network. Also used to determine the available network bandwidth.
Link-Layer Topology Discovery Responder
Allows your computer to be discovered and located by other computers and
devices on the network.
Although you will probably use only IPv4 on your home or small-office network, you
should understand how IPv6 works and be able to configure the protocol. You can
manually assign IPv4 and IPv6 addresses using static IP addresses, or automatically
assign them using dynamic IP addresses. You configure the IPv4 and IPv6 protocols
in exactly the same way, with the following exceptions:
IPv4 uses subnet masks, and IPv6 uses subnet prefix lengths.
IPv4 uses both DNS and WINS for locating computers and devices on the net-
work, and IPv6 uses only DNS.
IPv4 allows for automatic private IP addressing if a DHCP server cannot be
located, and IPv6 simply assigns the computer a local–local unicast (private) IP
address based on the MAC address of the network adapter.
On a per-network-connection basis, you can configure the networking protocols
used by completing the following steps:
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel, click Network and Internet and then click Network and
Sharing Center.
3. In the Network and Sharing Center, click “Manage network connections” under
Tasks. This opens the Network Connections window.
4. Right-click the network connection you want to configure and then select Prop-
erties. This displays a Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure 14-11.
5. On the Networking tab, you can use the checkboxes provided to manipulate the
different protocols associated with the network adapter. You can turn the differ-
ent protocols on and off by clicking the checkbox associated with each protocol:
• If you are using file and printer sharing on your network, you must enable
both Client for Microsoft Networks, and File and Printer Sharing for
Microsoft Networks. The QoS protocol offers greater flexibility in the flow
of data by prioritizing the different requests made by the client.
If you are using the IPv6 protocol for connectivity, you also must use the
QoS Packet Scheduler, which Windows selects by default. If you are not
using this protocol, you should disable it by unchecking the box associated
with this protocol.
If you are using the IPv4 protocol for connectivity, you must leave the Inter-
net Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) box checked.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required