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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Chapter 17: Mastering Dial-Up, Broadband, and On-the-Go Networking
If you have a PCI card to install, install it as discussed in Chapter 5. If you have a
PCMCIA card or a USB adapter, slide the card into the appropriate slot in your com-
puter. Once you have installed the PCMCIA card or USB adapter into your com-
puter, Windows Vista should automatically see the device and install a driver for the
adapter or ask you to install a driver for the adapter. See Chapter 5 for details on
installing the device driver.
If you are using an integrated wireless network card in your computer and this card
is not enabled, reboot the computer into the BIOS. (Most OEM manufacturers use
the Delete key. Press the Delete key every second or so after the reboot to enter the
main BIOS screen.) Usually, you can find the network card settings under Integrated
Devices. Once you have found the wireless network card settings in your BIOS,
select and enable the device. After you have enabled the device, save the changes in
the BIOS and reboot your computer into the operating system.
When you have completed the setup process, you will need to open Device Manager
to verify that the installation of the wireless adapter finished correctly. In Device
Manager, right-click on the adapter you previously installed or enabled and select
Properties from the context menu. On the Driver tab, verify that the details for the
Driver Provider listing are correct. If you see Microsoft listed, you should go to your
network adapter manufacturer’s web site and download the latest driver for your
network card. This allows you to use the entire functionality of the card. Microsoft
drivers usually allow you only the lowest common features of the card.
If you do not see a network adapter listed in the Device Manager screen under Net-
work Adapters, you should verify that the device does not show up under Other
Devices as a network controller. If this happens, you should go to your network
adapter manufacturer’s web site and download the latest driver for your network
card. If you continue to have problems installing the network card, refer to the net-
working troubleshooting section in Chapter 14.
Creating Wireless Connections
To connect to a wireless network, you must create a wireless network connection.
Windows Vista makes this process very intuitive. You can create wireless network
connections by following these steps:
1. Click Start and then click Control Panel. In the Control Panel, click Network
and Internet and then click Network and Sharing Center.
2. In the Network and Sharing Center, click “Manage wireless networks” in the left
pane.
3. In the “Manage wireless networks” window, shown in Figure 17-19, you’ll see a
list of any currently defined wireless network connections.
4. Click Add. This starts the “Manually connect to a wireless network” Wizard, as
shown in Figure 17-20.
Wireless Networking
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Figure 17-19. Viewing wireless connections
Figure 17-20. Adding a wireless connection
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Chapter 17: Mastering Dial-Up, Broadband, and On-the-Go Networking
5. Select one of the following options:
Add a network that is in range of this computer
Making this selection shows you a list of networks within range of your
computer and allows you to connect to them (see Figure 17-21). Click the
name of the wireless connection you want to use and then click Connect. If
the network requires a security key or pass phrase and you haven’t previ-
ously provided and saved this information, enter the required credentials
when prompted. If the network is unsecured, the wizard will prompt you to
authorize this connection. Once you have completed the connection, you
are prompted to define the network type as Home, Work, or Internet.
Selecting Home or Work implies that the network is secure and that you can
share resources with other computers on the network. If you select Internet,
this implies that the network is unsecured, or in a public place, and Win-
dows Vista locks down the ability to share resources with other computers
on the network.
Manually create a network profile
Making this selection creates a new wireless network profile and saves the
profile to your computer. As shown in Figure 17-22, you are prompted for
the Network name, Security type, Encryption type, and Security Key/Pass-
phrase for access to the wireless network. Select the “Start this network con-
nection automatically” checkbox if you want to connect to this network
without prompting. Click “Connect even if the network is not broadcasting”
if you have a stealth wireless network. When you click Next, the wizard adds
the network to your list and prompts you to connect or change the settings.
Figure 17-21. Selecting the network to connect to

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