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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Chapter 19: Managing Disks and Drives
Disk Management displays a warning prompt (see Figure 19-6). If you are sure
you want to delete the volume, click Yes.
3. In Disk Management, right-click the disk you want to convert and select Con-
vert to Basic Disk. This changes the dynamic disk to a basic disk, and you can
then partition and format the disk for use.
Preparing Disks for Use
Disk Management uses the same set of dialog boxes and wizards whether you are
partitioning basic disks or dynamic disks. By default, the first three volumes on a
basic drive are created automatically as primary partitions. If you try to create a
fourth volume on a basic drive, the remaining free space on the drive is converted
automatically to an extended partition with a logical drive that is the same size as the
extended partition. Any subsequent volumes are created in the extended partitions as
logical drives automatically.
In Disk Management, you create partitions, logical drives, and simple volumes on an
internal or external hard disk drive by completing the following steps:
1. In Disk Management’s Graphical view, right-click an unallocated or free area
and then choose New Simple Volume.
2. In the New Simple Volume Wizard, click Next.
3. On the Specify Volume Size page, shown in Figure 19-7, size the volume within
the maximum and minimum size limits. If you want the volume to use all the
space available, set the volume size equal to the value shown for the maximum
disk space in MB. Click Next.
4. On the Assign Drive Letter or Path page, shown in Figure 19-8, use the “Assign
the following drive letter” list to assign a drive letter to the volume, and then
click Next.
Figure 19-6. Confirming that you want to delete the volume
Preparing Disks for Use
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673
On most systems, the drive letter B and drive letters E through Z are
available, with drive letter A reserved for a floppy disk, C assigned to
the primary disk, and D assigned to the CD/DVD drive. If your com-
puter has a secondary hard disk, a secondary CD/DVD drive, or both,
you may find that drive letter E or the drive letters E and F are already
assigned as well.
Figure 19-7. Setting the volume size
Figure 19-8. Assigning a drive letter
674
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Chapter 19: Managing Disks and Drives
On the Format Partition page, shown in Figure 19-9, use the “File system” list to set
the filesystem type. The options you have depend on the size of the volume and type
of device, and they include FAT, FAT32, and NTFS. NTFS is selected by default in
most cases. If you create a filesystem as FAT or FAT32, you can later convert it to
NTFS. However, you can’t convert NTFS partitions to FAT or FAT32.
1. The “Allocation unit size” list sets the cluster size for the filesystem. A cluster is a
logical grouping of file sectors. In most cases, you’ll want the “Allocation unit
size” list to be set to Default. This allows Windows Vista to optimize the cluster
size based on the volume size.
On the Windows operating system, most disk drives use a fixed sector
size of 512 bytes, and because of this, a cluster is typically made up of
multiple sectors. For example, if the cluster size is 4,096 bytes, there
will be four 512-byte file sectors per cluster. If you create large quanti-
ties of small files, you might want to use a smaller cluster size, such as
512 or 1,024 bytes. With these settings, small files use less disk space.
With that said, it is important to point out that the disk drive industry
is transitioning to large-sector disks. See http://support.microsoft.com/
kb/923332/en-us for more information.
2. The “Volume label” text box sets a text label for the volume. By default, the
label is set to “New volume.”
Figure 19-9. Setting the formatting options

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