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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Using Compression and Encryption
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You can expand a disk by completing these steps:
1. In Windows Explorer or Disk Management, right-click the drive that contains
the disk that you want to expand and then select Properties.
2. On the General tab, clear the “Compress drive to save disk space” checkbox and
then click OK twice.
3. In the Confirm Attribute Changes dialog box, shown in Figure 19-16, specify
whether you want to expand only the top-level folder of the drive or the entire
drive:
To expand only the drive’s top-level folder, select “Apply changes to drive...
only.”
To expand the drive’s top-level folder, subfolders, and files, select “Apply
changes to drive..., subfolders and files.”
4. Click OK.
Compressing Files and Folders
Instead of compressing an entire drive, Windows Vista allows you to compress files
and folders selectively. When you compress a folder, you can elect to compress only
the folder and the files it contains, or the folder, its subfolders, and all related files.
Compressing a file or folder
Any files or folders you create in a compressed folder are compressed automatically.
When you move an uncompressed file or folder to a compressed drive or folder, the
file or folder is compressed automatically when you are moving between drives.
However, if you move an uncompressed file or folder to a compressed folder on the
same NTFS drive, the file or folder isn’t compressed automatically and you will need
to compress the file or folder manually.
Figure 19-16. Confirming the uncompress options
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Chapter 19: Managing Disks and Drives
You can compress a file or folder by completing these steps:
1. In Windows Explorer, right-click the file or folder that you want to compress
and then select Properties.
2. On the General tab of the Properties dialog box, click Advanced.
3. In the Advanced Attributes dialog box, shown in Figure 19-17, select the “Com-
press contents to save disk space” checkbox and then click OK.
4. For an individual file, Windows Vista marks the file as compressed and then
compresses it. For a folder, Windows Vista marks the folder as compressed and
then compresses all the files in it. If a folder contains subfolders, Windows Vista
displays the Confirm Attribute Changes dialog box, shown in Figure 19-18:
To compress only the folder and the files it contains, select “Apply changes
to this folder only” and then click OK.
To compress the folder, subfolders, and all related files, select “Apply
changes to this folder, subfolders and files” and then click OK.
Expanding a file or folder to remove compression
If you later decide that you no longer want to compress a folder or file, you can remove
compression. Before you do this, you should ensure that the drive has adequate free
space to accommodate the expanded files. Typically, you’ll need at least 50 percent
more free space on the disk to expand its contents successfully. If a compressed folder
currently uses 2 GB of space, this means you’d probably need about 1 GB of free space
to expand the folder successfully.
Figure 19-17. Compressing the disk

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