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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Installing and Running Your Software
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3. Under Programs, right-click the folder for the program group or the shortcut you
want to work with and then select Copy.
4. Right-click the Start button and select Explore All Users. This starts Windows
Explorer with the Start Menu folder for all users selected.
5. Right-click Programs and then select Paste. The program group or shortcut
should now be available to all users of the computer.
6. Repeat steps 2–5 as necessary to copy all the related program groups and short-
cuts for the software application.
You can make a program available only to you rather than to all users by completing
these steps:
1. Log on using your account.
2. Right-click the Start button and select Explore All Users. This starts Windows
Explorer with the Start Menu folder for all users selected.
3. Select Programs, right-click the folder for the program group or shortcut that
you want to work with, and select Cut.
4. Right-click the Start button and select Explore. This starts Windows Explorer
with your Start Menu folder selected.
5. Right-click Programs and then select Paste. The program group or shortcut
should now be available only to you.
6. Repeat steps 2–5 as necessary to copy all the related program groups and short-
cuts for the software application.
Moving the software’s program group or shortcuts doesn’t prevent
other users from running the program; it simply hides the program
from other users. They may still be able to start the software from
Windows Explorer.
Configuring Compatibility for MS-DOS or 16-Bit Software
Windows Vista cannot run MS-DOS or 16-bit programs that require direct access to
your computer’s hardware or that require 16-bit drivers. Windows Vista can run
only MS-DOS or 16-bit programs that don’t require direct access to your computer’s
hardware and that don’t require 16-bit drivers.
When you run an MS-DOS or 16-bit program, Windows Vista performs some com-
patibility tasks automatically. Under MS-DOS and 16-bit filesystems, filenames and
directory names are restricted to eight characters with a three-character file exten-
sion, such as Chapter3.txt. This naming convention is often referred to as the 8.3 file-
naming rule or the standard MS-DOS file-naming rule. MS-DOS and 16-bit folder
paths are similarly restricted. On the other hand, the filesystems used with Windows
Vista support long filenames with up to 255 characters. To help ensure that MS-DOS

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