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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Chapter 4: Installing, Configuring, and Maintaining Software
and 16-bit applications are compatible with your computer, Windows Vista trans-
lates between long and short filenames to ensure that your computer’s filesystems are
protected when an MS-DOS or 16-bit program modifies files and folders.
Windows Vista runs these MS-DOS and 16-bit programs using a virtual machine that
mimics the 386-enhanced mode used by the original operating systems for which
these programs were developed: Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1. Unlike earlier Win-
dows releases, Windows Vista runs multiple MS-DOS and 16-bit programs within a
single virtual machine. Although each program is managed using a separate thread, all
the programs share a common memory space. As a result, if one MS-DOS or 16-bit
program fails, it usually means others running on the computer will fail as well.
You can help prevent one 16-bit or MS-DOS program from causing another to fail by
running it in a separate memory space. Although running a program in a separate
memory space uses additional memory, you’ll usually find that the program is more
responsive. Another added benefit is that you’ll be able to run multiple instances of
the program—as long as all the instances are running in separate memory spaces.
To configure a 16-bit or MS-DOS program to run in a separate memory space, com-
plete the following steps.
1. Right-click the program’s shortcut or menu option and then select Properties.
This opens the program’s Properties dialog box.
2. On the Shortcut tab, click the Advanced button. This displays the Advanced
Properties dialog box.
3. Select the “Run in separate memory space” checkbox.
4. Click OK twice to close all open dialog boxes and save the changes.
Configuring Compatibility for Other Software
Windows Vista warns you if you try to install a program with a known compatibility
issue and opens the Program Compatibility Assistant to help you resolve the prob-
lem. Sometimes, however, a program won’t install or it will install but won’t run,
and you won’t know why. To get the program to install or run you’ll need to adjust
its compatibility settings, and Windows Vista provides two ways of doing this:
Using the Program Compatibility Wizard to configure compatibility settings for
you
Editing a program’s compatibility settings yourself
Although both techniques work the same way, the Program Compatibility Wizard is
the only way you can change compatibility settings for programs that are on shared
network drives, CD or DVD drives, or other types of removable media drives. The
Installing and Running Your Software
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capability to work with various types of media allows the Program Compatibility
Wizard to install programs that otherwise would not install.
Running the Program Compatibility Wizard
The Program Compatibility Wizard is similar to the Program Compatibility Assis-
tant. The key differences between the two are:
Windows Vista runs the Program Compatibility Assistant automatically when
you try to install a program with a known compatibility issue.
The Program Compatibility Wizard is a feature that you can use if you suspect a
compatibility issue is preventing you from installing or running a program.
You can start and use the Program Compatibility Wizard by completing the follow-
ing steps:
1. Click Start
All Programs Accessories and then select Program Compatibility
Wizard. If this option is not available, click Start
Help and Support. In the
Help and Support console, type
Program Compatibility Wizard into the Search
box and then press Enter. Click Start the Program Compatibility Wizard or a
similar option and then click the “Click to open the Program Compatibility Wiz-
ard” link.
2. Read the welcome message and then click Next. As shown in Figure 4-3, specify
how you want to locate the program you would like to run with compatibility
settings. You can:
Choose from a list of programs
Typically, you’ll use this option if you are configuring compatibility for a pro-
gram you installed but which won’t run or runs with errors. If you choose
this option and click Next, Windows Vista searches your computer for all
program executables and allows you to choose one of the programs it finds.
Use the program in the CD-ROM or other removable media drive
Typically, you’ll use this option to help you install or run a program on a
CD or DVD. If you choose this option and click Next, Windows Vista lets
you configure compatibility options for the program in your computer’s CD
or DVD drive.
Locate the program manually
Typically, you’ll choose this option if neither of the other options works, and
you want to browse files and folders to find the program you want to work
with. If you want to use this option, click Next and then click Browse. You
can then use the Please Select Application dialog box to locate the program’s
executable file, which can be an .exe, .com, .pif, .cmd, .bat, or .lnk file.

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