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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Learning About Your Computer’s Hardware Devices
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Resources by connection
Displays the status of all allocated resources by connection type rather than
device type.
Show hidden devices
Displays non-Plug and Play devices as well as devices that have been physically
removed from the computer but haven’t had their drivers uninstalled.
Getting to Know Your Computers Hardware Devices
Since working with the various device types is straightforward but not always intui-
tive, let’s look at the primary types of devices and how they are used. After reading
this section, you’ll know more about the ways you can work with and customize
your computer’s devices. Customizing your computer’s keyboard, mouse, and audio
settings is covered next.
Disk drives
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of the physical hard
disks installed in the computer by type, such as USB or ATA. If you right-click a disk,
select Properties, and then click the Policies tab, you’ll see an important configura-
tion option regarding the disk’s write-caching optimization (see Figure 5-7). Any
removable disk, such as a USB disk, should be optimized for quick removal. Any
fixed disk, such as an ATA disk, should be optimized for performance. These are the
default and standard configurations.
Figure 5-7. Viewing the disk driver settings for caching and safe removal
144
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Chapter 5: Customizing Your Computer’s Hardware Devices
Display adapters
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of graphics cards
(display adapters) installed in the computer by manufacturer and model, such as
NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200. If the device supports Windows Display Driver Model
(WDDM), which is a requirement for Windows Vista Premium Ready computers,
this should also be listed (in most cases).
DVD/CD-ROM drives
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of the DVD/CD-
ROM drives installed in the computer by manufacturer, type, and model. For DVD
drives, if you want to know the type of read/write disks your computer supports, this
is the place to check. The disk name should list DVD+RW if the DVD-ROM drive
can burn to DVD+R discs, DVD-RW if the DVD-ROM drive can burn to DVD-R
discs, or DVD+-RW if the DVD-ROM drive can burn to DVD+R and DVD-R discs.
Another tricky feature when burning DVD discs is the region code. Most DVDs are
encoded to play in specific regions. In the United States, your DVD player is most
likely set to work with Region 1-encoded discs. If you move to another country
because of deployment, transfer, or whatever, you may find that you need to change
the region code on your computer’s DVD-ROM drive. You can do this by right-
clicking the DVD-ROM drive in Device Manager, selecting Properties, and then
clicking the DVD Region tab, as shown in Figure 5-8. On the DVD Region tab,
select a country or geographic region and then click OK.
You can change your DVD-ROM drive only a limited number of
times—as per the “Changes remaining” value. When the “Changes
remaining” value reaches zero, you cannot change the region even if
you reinstall Windows or move the DVD drive to a different computer.
Human interface devices
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of the general-purpose
input devices that are configured specifically as human interface devices, including
mouse devices, trackballs, and keyboards. These devices are also listed under their spe-
cific device type.
IEEE 1394 bus host controllers
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of the IEEE 1394
host controllers installed in your computer. You won’t see this entry if your com-
puter doesn’t support IEEE 1394.
Learning About Your Computer’s Hardware Devices
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145
Keyboards
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of the keyboards
connected to the computer. Most keyboards have a power management setting that
allows you to wake the computer by pressing a key. You can control this configura-
tion by right-clicking the keyboard device, selecting Properties, and then clicking the
Power Management tab, as shown in Figure 5-9. If you don’t want to allow the
device to wake the computer, clear the “Allow this device to wake the computer”
checkbox.
Mice and other pointing devices
When you select Disk Drives in Device Manager, you’ll see a list of the mouse, track-
ball, and other pointing devices connected to the computer. Most pointing devices
have a power management setting that allows you to wake the computer by moving
the device.
Figure 5-8. Viewing the encoded DVD region

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