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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Chapter 6: Mastering Windows Explorer and Searching Your Computer
For movies and videos in Windows Media Player-supported formats, you’ll see a pre-
view of the first frame, filename, date modified, date created, and size (Figure 6-8).
Navigating Your Computer with the Address Bar
The ubiquitous Address bar appears at the top of Windows Explorer and all its
related views. Because you see the Address bar so much, you may take it for granted
and not get the most out of its new features. Let’s fix that by taking a closer look at
what the Address bar offers.
Accessing Locations on Your Computer
The Address bar displays your current location as a series of links separated by
arrows. This allows you to determine the current location on your computer, on
your network, or on the Internet. File and folder locations aren’t the only types of
locations you can navigate using these features. You can also navigate Control Panel
categories and network devices.
In the example shown in Figure 6-9, the location is:
Computer Local Disk (C:) Users williams
This tells you that the absolute path followed to get to the current location is C:\
Users\williams.
In some cases, you might also see a relative or abbreviated path, such as may happen
when you follow a shortcut or browse to a path that cannot be fully depicted on the
Address bar. As shown in Figure 6-10, a relative or abbreviated path is indicated by
the left-pointing double-angle character (<<). In this example, the location is:
&#171; mypictures Summer Vacation Islands of Adventure
This tells you that the relative or abbreviated path of the current location is
mypictures\Summer Vacation\Islands of Adventure.
Figure 6-8. Summary for a video file
Figure 6-9. The address path, which lists the current location
Navigating Your Computer with the Address Bar
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When you are working with network paths in the Network view of Windows
Explorer, as shown in Figure 6-11, you’ll have quick access to network locations and
shared resources on remote servers. Click the Network entry in the path to display a
list of remote computers and network resources. Click the name of a remote com-
puter or network resource to list its shared resources.
Here are the features of the Address bar, from left to right:
Forward/Back buttons
The Forward and Back buttons allow you to navigate locations you’ve already
visited. Similar to when you are browsing the Web, the locations you’ve visited
are stored in a location history, and you can browse the location history by click-
ing the Forward and Back buttons.
Recent Pages button
The Recent Pages button provides a drop-down list of recently accessed loca-
tions. You can jump to a recently accessed location quickly by clicking the
Recent Pages button and then clicking the desired location. Because the recently
accessed locations are limited to the current session, only locations you’ve
accessed since starting Windows Explorer are listed.
Address Path button
The Address Path button shows the absolute or relative path you are currently
accessing and provides options for working with this path. As discussed next,
the Address path includes a Location Indicator icon, a Path Selection list but-
ton, Location Path entries, and a Previous Locations button.
Refresh button
The Refresh button refreshes the view. Clicking the Refresh button displays any
updates to contents in the selected location.
Out of all these features, the one you’ll work with the most is the Address path. The
Address path has four key components, and from left to right, they are:
Figure 6-10. The address path providing a relative location
Figure 6-11. Working with network resources

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