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WordPress® All-in-One For Dummies® by Michael Torbert, Andrea Rennick, Kevin Palmer, Cory Miller, Lisa Sabin-Wilson

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Understanding the Difference between Posts and Pages

In Book III, Chapter 7, we go into great detail about how WordPress archives your published content on your site by filing it under categories and tags, as well as by date (year/month/day/time of day), and through the use of pages, rather than posts.

Pages, in WordPress, are different from posts because they don't get archived the way your blog posts/articles do: They aren't categorized or tagged, don't appear in your listing of recent blog posts or date archives, and aren't syndicated in the RSS feeds available on your site — because content within pages generally doesn't change. Pages are considered static or stand-alone content and exist separately from the archived post content on your site.

With the page feature, you can create an unlimited amount of static pages separate from your blog posts. People commonly use this feature to create About Me or Contact Me pages, among other things. Table 2-1 illustrates the differences between posts and pages by showing you the different ways the WordPress platform handles them.

Table 2-1 Differences between a Post and a Page

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