World History

Book description

Take a trip through the defining moments of our global story and see the thinkers, leaders, ideas, and inventions that have shaped the world.

Presented in a beautiful slipcase, World History is an essential guide for anyone who loves history or wants to broaden their knowledge. This accessible book covers over 350 of the world's most important turning points, from our earliest human ancestors of prehistory to political events of the modern world.

Follow detailed maps showing the continuous movement of humans across the Earth, and examine fascinating paintings illustrating the events and individuals that took them there. Beautiful photography throughout the book will carry you back in time to see the people and places of the stories - along with stunning artifacts from every historical period.

From magnificent buildings like the Colosseum to magnificent words like "I have a dream!", this guide brings history's most significant events to life for every reader to discover and enjoy.

Table of contents

  1. Contents 4 (1/2)
  2. Contents 4 (2/2)
  3. Foreword 10
  4. What Is History? 12
  5. The ancient past 16
  6. The first historians 18
  7. An era of scholarship 20
  8. A new age of empire 22
  9. Past, present, and future 24
  10. The Prehistoric World 26
  11. The world to 3000 bce 28
  12. The Australopithecines 30
  13. Homo habilis 31
  14. Homo erectus 31
  15. Tool making and speech 32
  16. The Neanderthals 33
  17. The Ice Ages 34
  18. Homo sapiens in Africa 35
  19. Settling the world 36
  20. Hunter-gatherers 38
  21. Art and ritual 39
  22. The cradle of agriculture 42
  23. The spread of farming 43
  24. The first villages 44
  25. Discovery of metals 45
  26. Megaliths 46
  27. The first towns 48
  28. Early Mesopotamia 49
  29. Predynastic Egypt 49
  30. The Ancient World 50
  31. The world in 3000–700 bce 52
  32. The Sumerians 54
  33. Ur 55
  34. The Akkadian Empire 55
  35. The rise of Babylon 56
  36. The Hittites 57
  37. The late Bronze Age collapse 58
  38. The Phoenicians 58
  39. The Assyrian Empire 59
  40. The invention of writing 60
  41. The Old Kingdom 62
  42. The pyramids 63
  43. The Middle Kingdom 66
  44. Egyptian religion 67
  45. The New Kingdom and after 68
  46. Minoan Crete 70
  47. The Palace of Knossos 71
  48. The Mycenaeans 71
  49. The Indus Valley civilization 74
  50. Mohenjo-Daro 75
  51. Early Chinese cultures 76
  52. Shang China 77
  53. The Chavín of Peru 78
  54. The Olmecs 79
  55. The Classical World 80
  56. The world in 700 bce–600 ce 82
  57. The Achaemenid Empire 84
  58. Persepolis 85
  59. Persian religion 86
  60. Parthian Persia 86
  61. Sassanid Persia 87
  62. Archaic Greece 88
  63. The Greek–Persian wars 89
  64. Athens and democracy 90
  65. Greek colonization 91
  66. The Peloponnesian War 94
  67. Classical Greek culture 95
  68. The conquests of Alexander the Great 96
  69. The successors of Alexander 98 Hellenistic culture 99
  70. Early Rome 100
  71. The Roman Republic 101
  72. The Punic Wars 102
  73. The end of the Republic 104
  74. The first emperor: Augustus 105
  75. The government and army 106
  76. The early empire 107
  77. The empire at its height 108
  78. Crisis and reform 110
  79. Constantine and the new Christian Empire 112
  80. The fall of the Roman Empire 113
  81. The Celts 114
  82. Successor states to Rome 115
  83. The Scythians 116
  84. The Huns 117
  85. The Kushans 117
  86. Chandragupta and the rise of the Mauryans 118
  87. Ashoka and Buddhism 119
  88. Gupta India 119
  89. World religions 122
  90. The warring states 124
  91. The First Emperor 125
  92. Han China 126
  93. Teotihuacán 128
  94. The Zapotecs 129
  95. Classic Maya culture 130
  96. Early South America 131
  97. The Medieval World 132
  98. The world in 600–1450 134
  99. China disunited 136
  100. Tang China 137
  101. Song China 138
  102. Mongol and Ming China 139
  103. The Mongols 142
  104. Early Japan 144
  105. The Asuka and Nara periods 144
  106. The Heian period 145
  107. The Kamakura and Muromachi shogunates 146
  108. Gunpowder weaponry 148
  109. Medieval Korea 150
  110. The Khmer Empire 152
  111. Pagan Burma 152
  112. Champa 153
  113. Dai Viet 153
  114. Srivijaya 153
  115. The rise of Islam 154
  116. The Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates 155
  117. The Seljuk Turks 156
  118. Rise of the Ottomans 157
  119. Chola India 158
  120. The Delhi Sultanate 159
  121. The Mali Empire 160
  122. Ife and Benin 161
  123. Great Zimbabwe 161
  124. Ostrogoths and Lombards in Italy 162
  125. Visigoths in Spain 163
  126. Anglo-Saxon England 163
  127. Merovingian and Carolingian France 164
  128. Feudalism 166
  129. The Vikings 168
  130. Kievan Rus 168
  131. The Normans 169
  132. Monasticism 170
  133. Popes and emperors 171
  134. The Crusades 172
  135. The Black Death 176
  136. The Hundred Years’ War 177
  137. The early Byzantine Empire 178
  138. Byzantine survival and fall 179
  139. The Toltecs 180
  140. The Maya 180
  141. The Aztecs 182
  142. Early North American cultures 183
  143. Early cultures of South America 184
  144. The Inca Empire 185
  145. Polynesian expansion and navigation 188
  146. The Maori 189
  147. Easter Island 189
  148. The Early Modern World 190
  149. The world in 1450–1750 192
  150. Decline of the Ming 194
  151. The rise of the Qing 195
  152. China under the Qing 195
  153. Japan united and the Tokugawa shogunate 196
  154. India under the Mughals 198
  155. The Ottoman Empire 202
  156. Safavid Persia 204
  157. Voyages of discovery 206
  158. Columbus lands in America 208
  159. Spain conquers Mexico 209
  160. Spain conquers Peru 209
  161. The Spanish Empire in the New World 210
  162. European colonies in North America 211
  163. Trading empires 212
  164. Humanism 214
  165. The Renaissance 215
  166. The Reformation and Counter-Reformation 218
  167. Printing 220
  168. The Italian Wars 221
  169. The French Wars of Religion 221
  170. The rise of Spain 222
  171. The Spanish Armada 223
  172. The Dutch revolt 223
  173. The Thirty Years’ War 224
  174. The English Civil War 225
  175. The emergence of Muscovy 226
  176. Poland–Lithuania 227
  177. The rise of Sweden and the Great Northern War 227
  178. 17th-century France and absolutism 228
  179. The rise of capitalism and the slave trade 229
  180. The scientific revolution and the Enlightenment 230
  181. The World Of Empires 232
  182. The world in 1750–1914 234
  183. Europeans in the Americas 236
  184. The French and Indian War 237
  185. The Revolutionary War 238
  186. The expansion of the United States 240
  187. The slide to civil war 241
  188. The American Civil War 242
  189. Latin American independence 244
  190. The Seven Years’ War 246
  191. The first global war 247
  192. The French Revolution 248
  193. France under Napoleon 252
  194. The Napoleonic Wars 254
  195. Nationalism and revolution 256
  196. The unification of Germany 258
  197. The unification of Italy 259
  198. France under Napoleon III 260
  199. The Franco-Prussian War 260
  200. Victorian England 261
  201. Russia in the 19th century 262
  202. The Industrial Revolution 264
  203. Industrialization and the labor movement 266
  204. Socialism and Marxism 267
  205. Scientific advances 268
  206. The Battle of Plassey 270
  207. The British in India 271
  208. The Indian mutiny 272
  209. The Burmese Wars 272
  210. Turkish reform movements 273
  211. Qing China 274
  212. The Meiji restoration 276
  213. Exploration in the Pacific 278
  214. The First Fleet 279
  215. The exploration of Australia 279
  216. The federation of Australia 280
  217. European settlement in New Zealand 280
  218. The New Zealand Wars 281
  219. Antarctic exploration 281
  220. The early explorers 282
  221. The Scramble for Africa 283
  222. Egypt under Muhammad Ali 284
  223. The Mahdist movement 284
  224. The Boer Wars 285
  225. The Modern World 286
  226. The world in 1914–present 288
  227. Assassination at Sarajevo 290
  228. Escalation into war 291
  229. The Western Front 292
  230. The war at sea 294
  231. The war in eastern Europe 294
  232. Gallipoli 295
  233. Palestine and the Arab Revolt 295
  234. Stalemate in the west 296
  235. The US enters the war 296
  236. The end of the war 297
  237. The Treaty of Versailles 300
  238. Russia heads for revolution 302
  239. The 1917 Revolution 303
  240. The Russian Civil War 304
  241. Russia under Lenin and Stalin 305
  242. The Great Depression 306
  243. The rise of Fascism 308
  244. The Spanish Civil War 312
  245. Women and the vote 313
  246. Germany’s path to war 314
  247. Blitzkrieg and the fall of France 315
  248. The Battle of Britain 316
  249. Air power in World War II 317
  250. The German invasion of the USSR 318
  251. The battle of Stalingrad 319
  252. The war in North Africa 320
  253. The war in Italy 321
  254. Pearl Harbor 322
  255. The Japanese advance 323
  256. D-Day and the war in the west 324
  257. The defeat of Germany 326
  258. The Holocaust 328
  259. The defeat of Japan 332
  260. The atom bomb 334
  261. The Marshall Plan 336
  262. The European Community 337
  263. The Eastern bloc in Europe 337
  264. The Cold War 338
  265. Ireland and the troubles 340
  266. ETA 341
  267. Perestroika 341
  268. The collapse of Communism 342
  269. The war in Yugoslavia 346
  270. New challenges for Europe 347
  271. US economic growth 348
  272. McCarthyism 349
  273. The assassination of JFK 349
  274. Civil rights 350
  275. The Space Race 352
  276. The Cuban Revolution 353
  277. Allende and Pinochet 354
  278. Perón and Argentina 354
  279. The US in Latin America 355
  280. Democracy returns to Latin America 356
  281. The Falklands War 356
  282. NAFTA 357
  283. The Indian National Congress 358
  284. The partition of India 359
  285. Decolonialization 360
  286. The birth of Israel 362
  287. The Arab–Israeli conflict 364
  288. Oil and politics 366
  289. The Iranian Revolution 367
  290. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan 368
  291. Indo–Pakistan wars 368
  292. The Iran–Iraq war 369
  293. The first Gulf War 369
  294. Communist China 370
  295. The Korean War 372
  296. The first Indochina War 372
  297. The Vietnam War 373
  298. Japan, China, and the tiger economies 374
  299. Rhodesia and UDI 375
  300. Post-colonial Africa 376
  301. The end of apartheid 378
  302. Biotechnology 382
  303. Medical advances and new diseases 383
  304. Globalization 384
  305. Climate change and the green movement 386
  306. The communications revolution 390
  307. 9/11 391
  308. The Afghan War 392
  309. The war in Iraq 393
  310. Beyond the nation state 394
  311. The Arab Spring 396
  312. ISIS and global terror 397
  313. The European Union and the crisis of populism 398
  314. Russia and Ukraine 399
  315. Index 400 (1/3)
  316. Index 400 (2/3)
  317. Index 400 (3/3)
  318. Acknowledgments 414

Product information

  • Title: World History
  • Author(s): Philip Parker
  • Release date: October 2017
  • Publisher(s): DK Publishing
  • ISBN: 9781465473820