Worth-Focused Design, Book 1

Book description

This book develops an appropriate common language for truly interdisciplinary teams involved in design. Design now has many meanings. For some, it is the creation of value. For others, it is the conception and creation of artefacts. For still others, it is fitting things to people. These differences reflect disciplinary values that both overlap and diverge. All involve artefacts: we always design things. Each definition considers people and purpose in some way. Each handles evaluation differently, measuring against aesthetics, craft standards, specifications, sales, usage experiences, or usage outcomes. There are both merits and risks in these differences, without an appropriate balance. Poor balance can result from professions claiming the centre of design for their discipline, marginalising others. Process can also cause imbalance when allocating resources to scheduled stages. Balance is promoted by replacing power centres with power sharing, and divisive processes with integrative progressions. A focus on worth guides design towards worthwhile experiences and outcomes that generously exceed expectations.

This book places worth focus (Wo-Fo) into the context of design progressions that are balanced, integrated, and generous (BIG). BIG and Wo-Fo are symbiotic. Worth provides a focus for generosity. Effective Wo-Fo needs BIG practices. The companion book Worth-Focused Design, Book 2: Approaches, Contexts, and Case Studies (Cockton, 2020b) relates the concept of worth to experiences and outcomes based on a number of practical case studies.

Table of contents

  1. Preface (1/2)
  2. Preface (2/2)
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Three Years In: A Design Practice Fiction
    1. 1.1 How This Book Challenges Strongly Established Positions
    2. 1.2 What Is Important About How the Cloudbooks Team Works
  5. The Realities of Creative Design Practice
    1. 2.1 A Half Century of Research into Design
      1. 2.1.1 Co-Evolution
      2. 2.1.2 Developing Problem Situations
      3. 2.1.3 Handling Frames
      4. 2.1.4 Exploiting Themes
      5. 2.1.5 Fostering a Discourse
      6. 2.1.6 Other Summaries from Research into Design
    2. 2.2 Three Key Realities of Creative Design Practices
      1. 2.2.1 Co-Evolution
      2. 2.2.2 Generosity
      3. 2.2.3 Reflective Communal Conversations via the Materials of a Design Situation
      4. 2.2.4 Three Intimately Connected Realities
    3. 2.3 What Actually Co-evolves?
    4. 2.4 Creative Connections Between Design Arenas
    5. 2.5 Understandings of Creative Design Work in HCI Research
    6. 2.6 Chapter Summary
  6. We Need to Talk About Process: A Design Practice Research Fiction
    1. 3.1 A Six-Act Fiction
      1. 3.1.1 Act 1: Johan Draws for Mohan
      2. 3.1.2 Act 2: Bring Me My Arrows of Desire
      3. 3.1.3 Act 3: Ask a Standards Question, Get a Standard Answer
      4. 3.1.4 Act 4: Shock and Tell
      5. 3.1.5 Act 5: Daniel You’re a Star
      6. 3.1.6 Act 6: What Do the Award Winners Think?
    2. 3.2 Something Magic Happens
    3. 3.3 A Balanced Design Manifesto
  7. Status not Process: Abstract Design Situations as Snapshots of Design Work
    1. 4.1 Abstraction, Status, and Situations
      1. 4.1.1 Arenas as Symbolic Spaces
    2. 4.2 Design Arenas
      1. 4.2.1 An Arena for Evaluation Work
      2. 4.2.2 An Arena for Strategic Design Purpose
      3. 4.2.3 An Arena for A_tefacts: Artefacts and Antefacts
      4. 4.2.4 An Arena for Anyficiaries: Beneficiaries and Maleficiaries
    3. 4.3 Design Paradigms as Abstract Design Situations
      1. 4.3.1 The Applied Arts Design Paradigm
      2. 4.3.2 The Engineering Design Paradigm
      3. 4.3.3 The Human-Centred Design Paradigm
      4. 4.3.4 Comparing Design Paradigms
      5. 4.3.5 Fairness for Design Arenas from Design Paradigms
    4. 4.4 A Post-Centric Abstract Design Situation Template
      1. 4.4.1 Axiofacts and the Limitations of Dorst’s Logical Frames
    5. 4.5 Chapter Summary
  8. Tracking BIG Creative Design Practice
    1. 5.1 Tracking Design Work with MADS
      1. 5.1.1 Adding Episode Generators to MADS
      2. 5.1.2 Sequences of MADS (SoMADS)
    2. 5.2 Tracking Design Work with PADS
    3. 5.3 Tracking with Design Arena Frames (DAFs)
    4. 5.4 Tracking with Design Arena Notes (DANs)
    5. 5.5 Uses of ADS Constructs in Education and Design Work
    6. 5.6 Connection Notes (CoNs)
    7. 5.7 Connection Frames (COFs)
    8. 5.8 Retrospective Representations in HCI Research Through Design
    9. 5.9 Critical Reflection and Disciplinary Values in BIG Design
    10. 5.10 Chapter Summary
  9. Enabling Creative Critical Design Practices (1/2)
  10. Enabling Creative Critical Design Practices (2/2)
  11. Glossary and Abbreviations (1/2)
  12. Glossary and Abbreviations (2/2)
  13. References (1/3)
  14. References (2/3)
  15. References (3/3)
  16. Author Biography
  17. Blank Page (1/4)
  18. Blank Page (2/4)
  19. Blank Page (3/4)
  20. Blank Page (4/4)

Product information

  • Title: Worth-Focused Design, Book 1
  • Author(s): Gilbert Cockton
  • Release date: April 2020
  • Publisher(s): Morgan & Claypool Publishers
  • ISBN: 9781681730585