Gary Pollice

Gary Pollice

Gary Pollice is a self-labeled curmudgeon (that's a crusty, ill- tempered, usually old man) who spent over 35 years in industry trying to figure out what he wanted to be when he grew up. Even though he hasn't grown up yet, he did make the move in 2003 to the hallowed halls of academia where he has been corrupting the minds of the next generation of software developers with radical ideas like, "develop software for your customer, learn how to work as part of a team, design and code quality and elegance and correctness counts, and it's okay to be a nerd as long as you are a great one." Gary is also a co-author of Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.

Gary is a Professor of Practice (meaning he had a real job before becoming a professor) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He went to WPI because he was so impressed with the WPI graduates that he's worked with over the years. He lives in central Massachusetts with his wife, Vikki, and their two dogs, Aloysius and Ignatius. When not working on geeky things he ... well he's always working on geeky things. You can see what he's up to by visiting his WPI home page at http://web.cs.wpi.edu/~gpollice/. Feel free to drop him a note and complain or cheer about the book.

Algorithms in a Nutshell Algorithms in a Nutshell
by George T. Heineman, Gary Pollice, Stanley Selkow
October 2008
Print: $49.99
Ebook: $39.99

Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
by Brett McLaughlin, Gary Pollice, David West
November 2006
Print: $59.99
Ebook: $50.99

"It must be noted that much of this book is covered in some way by university-level computing degrees. Nonetheless, one tends to forget the principles and the algorithms themselves. One develops one's handful of favourites. This book helps one to keep playing with a full deck."
--Al Lukaszewski, About.com

"For readers just starting on design, or those wanting a good introduction without the density of Booch’s book, there is no better option than Head First Object-Oriented Analysis & Design. The Head First series of tutorials from O’Reilly are informal introductions to topics that include puzzles, quizzes, made-up dialogs, and numerous graphical elements that both entertain and instruct. This style is not to everyone’s liking, but it is undeniably effective as a means of teaching technical topics. In almost every category in which there is a Head First title, that book appears on the list of best-sellers on Amazon’s website. Of the Head First volumes I’ve seen, this one and the one on Java are probably the two best."
--Andrew Binstock, SD Times

"This book is a "keeper" - make room for it on your bookshelf as it's essential reading."
--Mike James, I Programmer

"Overall, this is a great book for developers looking for more tools in their arsenals. As you might suspect, this is not really a book to read cover to cover unless it's for a class. But it provides a clear and well laid out approach to some of the many algorithms that exist today in computer programming. It isn't an exhaustive list, but it certainly provides a great cross-section from which you could continue your search."
--Brian Fitzpatrick, Blogcrititcs Magazine

"I found it hard to write a review about this book. Why? Because apart from a few, very minor typos it is simply superb! In my opinion, it is one of the best and sure to be one of the most influential books in this subject area. The O’Reilly Head First series of books are fast becoming the de facto standard, and I recommend that anyone who wants to get a deeper understanding of how you should approach designing and developing software, read this book, no matter what your background or current skill set is. To date, I’ve read this book twice, cover to cover. It is not a particularly thin book, but it is very easy to read...It is a practical, readable and refreshing step-by-step walkthrough of the development process. It covers how to incorporate flexibility into all aspects of the software development life cycle. This book leads you through simple and then more advanced concepts by allowing you, the reader, to make the connections. In addition, it gives an easy to understand introduction to UML class diagrams."
--Mitch Wheat, Perth .NET CoP

"If you're a software developer or engineer - or a library catering to such patrons - you have to keep Head First Object-Oriented Analysis & Design in your reference section. It appeals to newcomers to the field, offering all the basics on how to analyze, design, and write serious object-oriented software, and explains the principles in language that assumes no prior familiarity with such analysis. Plenty of real-world examples and applications make for a top recommendation."
--James A. Cox, California Bookwatch

"There are solid guidelines within the book which portray OOA as flexible in the real world - in a way which is much more readable than many OOA&D texts out there. For those unfamiliar with Head First Labs, this would be a novelty - for those familiar with Head First Labs, this is expected."
--Taran Rampersad, KnowProse.com

"The first book written about Object-Oriented Analysis & Design (OOAD) that seeks to present information in the way that your brain works. It approaches the software development process with an emphasis on software, not code, on depth, not breadth. Using modern research in neurobiology, cognitive science, and learning theory, the authors stress the importance of the application rather than the theory. The objective of the book is to show readers how to analyze, design, and write valid object-oriented software that can be reused, maintained, and extended."
--Michael Kleper, The Kleper Report on Digital Publishing

"The Head First series is unique in that it makes it fun to learn a new and maybe somewhat confusing topic (like OOP). It takes the material and uses exercises, illustrations, and simple games to help the reader understand the information the author is trying to get across. It is not for everyone, but it's a great way in my opinion to teach the reader the material that helps them from not getting too bored. If you quickly glance at the book and see the many images that do not seem to relate to the material at all you will miss the really great material that is hidden within it. You really need to read the first 10 pages to know if this is the book for you or not. But if you do, then I am really sure you will want to continue to read the rest of the book. ...A great book that I highly recommend."
--Frank Stepanski, Amazon.com