Opportunities and Challenges in the IoT

A Conversation with Cory Doctorow and Tim O'Reilly

Opportunities and Challenges in the IoT

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In this transcript from O'Reilly's IoT Profiles video series, Tim O'Reilly and Cory Doctorow discuss the opportunities and challenges that the Internet of Things is bringing to our lives. This excerpt from the hour-long Google Hangout on Air begins about halfway into the discussion when Tim and Cory bring in questions from Twitter.

Highlights:

  • Using IoT to rethink industries
  • How IoT can give humans superpowers
  • Creating more efficient ways of working together
  • IoT in the public sector
  • Doing the right thing in the marketplace

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Cory Doctorow

Cory Doctorow

(www.craphound.com) is the co-editor of Boing Boing: A Directory of Wonderful Things (boingboing.net) and is the outreach coordinator for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (www.eff.org). Cory is a prolific and award-winning science fiction writer; his first novel, "Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom," will be published by Tor books in late 2002. He is a regular contributor to Wired magazine and a columnist for the O'Reilly Network.

Tim O'Reilly

Tim O'Reilly

Tim O'Reilly is the founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media Inc. Considered by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world, O'Reilly Media also hosts conferences on technology topics, including the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, Strata: The Business of Data, the Velocity Conference on Web Performance and Operations, and many others. Tim's blog, the O'Reilly Radar "watches the alpha geeks" to determine emerging technology trends, and serves as a platform for advocacy about issues of importance to the technical community. Tim is also a partner at O'Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, O'Reilly's early stage venture firm, and is on the board of Safari Books Online, PeerJ, Code for America, and Maker Media, which was recently spun out from O'Reilly Media. Maker Media's Maker Faire has been compared to the West Coast Computer Faire, which launched the personal computer revolution.