Software Architecture Patterns

Software Architecture Patterns

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The success of any application or system depends on the architecture pattern you use. By describing the overall characteristics of the architecture, these patterns not only guide designers and developers on how to design components, but also determine the ways in which those components should interact.

This O’Reilly report takes a deep dive into many common software architecture patterns. Each pattern includes a full explanation of how it works, explains the pattern’s benefits and considerations, and describes the circumstances and conditions it was designed to address. The report also includes an analysis and scorecard for each pattern based on several architecture and software development quality attributes.

Patterns include:

  • Layered architecture
  • Event-driven architecture
  • Microkernel architecture
  • Microservices architecture
  • Space-based architecture

In addition to these specific patterns, you’ll also learn about the Architecture by Implication anti-pattern and the causes and effects of not using architecture patterns.

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Mark Richards

Mark Richards

Mark Richards is an experienced hands-on software architect involved in the architecture, design, and implementation of Microservices Architectures, Service Oriented Architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983, and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the President of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 thru 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos, including "Software Architecture Fundamentals" (O’Reilly video), "Enterprise Messaging" (O’Reilly video), "Java Message Service 2nd Edition" (O’Reilly), and 97 Thinks Every Software Architect Should Know (O'Reilly). Mark has a masters degree in computer science and numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, The Open Group, and BEA. He is a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Symposium Series, and has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics.When he is not working Mark can usually be found hiking in the White Mountains or along the Appalachian Trail.