Steven Bird

Steven Bird

Steven Bird is Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at the University of Melbourne, and Senior Research Associate in the Linguistic Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed a PhD on computational phonology at the University of Edinburgh in 1990, supervised by Ewan Klein. He later moved to Cameroon to conduct linguistic fieldwork on the Grassfields Bantu languages under the auspices of the Summer Institute of Linguistics. More recently, he spent several years as Associate Director of the Linguistic Data Consortium where he led an R&D team to create models and tools for large databases of annotated text. At Melbourne University, he established a language technology research group and has taught at all levels of the undergraduate computer science curriculum. In 2009, Steven is President of the Association for Computational Linguistics.

Natural Language Processing with Python Natural Language Processing with Python
by Steven Bird, Ewan Klein, Edward Loper
June 2009
Print: $44.99
Ebook: $37.99

"Over all the book is an excellent book and I must say that it has been a very long time since I have read a book that was extremely satisfactory. I would like to very strongly recommend this book to Python lovers who would like to explore the world of Natural Language understanding, parsing and processing. It brings out a very strong factor of Python programming language. I give this book an "A+". "
--Sukanta Ganguly, BayPIGgies

"In summary, Natural Language Processing with Python delivers a solid education for any computing professional interested in the complexity and current state of the art in NLP systems. Python programmers will find the book especially Pythonic in the NLTK's implementation and use of NLP principles. While my dream of having an intelligent spoken word conversation with my computer may have to wait for another 25 years of computing evolution, this book helped me understand the complexities of the problem and ways to get closer to the solution."
--Mike Riley, Dr. Dobb's CodeTalk