Pete Warden

Pete Warden

Areas of Expertise:

  • Visualization
  • Hadoop
  • Big Data
Pete Warden is the founder of the OpenHeatMap project, writer of the Data Source Handbook for O'Reilly, a regular contributor to ReadWriteWeb, and a consultant to the New York Times. With 14 years experience building large-scale data processing solutions, including five as a senior engineer at Apple, Pete has been on the frontlines of Big Data, using, writing about, and contributing code to tools like Redis, MongoDB and Hadoop. He believes these services radically change what's possible, and speaks to audiences around the country about how they can do amazing things with their own data.

Big Data Glossary Big Data Glossary
by Pete Warden
September 2011
Print: $19.99
Ebook: $16.99

Data Source Handbook Data Source Handbook
by Pete Warden
February 2011
Print: $29.99
Ebook: $14.99

An Introduction to MapReduce with Pete Warden An Introduction to MapReduce with Pete Warden
by Pete Warden
June 2011
Video: $69.99

Visualizing Shared, Distributed Data Visualizing Shared, Distributed Data
by Roman Stanek, Pete Warden
March 2011
OUT OF PRINT

Pete blogs at:




Querkles

May 27 2015

read more

Protecting health through open data management principles

May 27 2015

Register for the free webcast, “Life Streams, Walled Gardens, and the Internet of Living Things.” Brigitte Piniewski and Hagen Finley will discuss the Internet of Living Things, what makes sensoring and monitoring data emanating from our bodies unique, and why … read more

Protecting health through open data management principles

May 27 2015

Register for the free webcast, “Life Streams, Walled Gardens, and the Internet of Living Things.” Brigitte Piniewski and Hagen Finley will discuss the Internet of Living Things, what makes sensoring and monitoring data emanating from our bodies unique, and why … read more

Dior and I

May 27 2015

read more

Building applications in Azure

May 27 2015

Download a free copy of “Azure for Developers,” an O’Reilly report by experienced .NET developer John Adams that breaks down Microsoft’s Azure platform in plain language, so that you can quickly get up to speed. One of the most natural … read more

Announcing Cassandra certification

May 27 2015

I am pleased to announce a joint program between O’Reilly and DataStax to certify Cassandra developers. This program complements our developer certification for Apache Spark and — just as in the case of Databricks and Spark — we are excited … read more

Why are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks?

May 23 2015

Picture by Retronator Deep learning is a very weird technology. It evolved over decades on a very different track than the mainstream of AI, kept alive by the efforts of a handful of believers. When I started using it a few years ago, it reminded me of the first time… read more

Jetpac’s deep learning framework on the Beaglebone Black

May 17 2015

Photo by Michael Nika I’ve been having a lot of fun porting the Jetpac image recognition library to new and tinier devices, and the latest addition to the family is the Beaglebone Black. As I mentioned in my Raspberry Pi 2 port, the Eigen math library has had a lot… read more

Image Recognition on the Raspberry Pi 2

May 10 2015

Photo by Shashinjutsu I loved the original Raspberry Pi, it was a great platform to run deep neural networks on, especially with a fully-programmable GPU. I was excited when the new Pi 2 was released, because it was even more powerful for the same low price. Unfortunately I heard back… read more

Webcast: How to Get Started with Deep Learning in Computer Vision
July 24, 2014
In this webcast Pete Warden will walk through some popular open-source tools from the academic world, and show you step-by-step how to process images with them.

"Data Source Handbook by Pete Warden is new, fresh, and covers many different interfaces that give you access to cool stuff...This book is very current, and if you get an electronic version that you can cut and paste from, you can, well, cut and paste from it and get up to speed even faster. And no Post-Its. You can interface with Google Books, various movie databases, and all sorts of other things. I highly recommend it."
--Greg Laden, Scienceblogs.com