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97 Things Every Programmer Should Know by Kevlin Henney

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Chapter 8. The Boy Scout Rule

Robert C. Martin (Uncle Bob)

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THE BOY SCOUTS HAVE A RULE: “Always leave the campground cleaner than you found it.” If you find a mess on the ground, you clean it up regardless of who might have made it. You intentionally improve the environment for the next group of campers. (Actually, the original form of that rule, written by Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, the father of scouting, was “Try and leave this world a little better than you found it.”)

What if we followed a similar rule in our code: “Always check a module in cleaner than when you checked it out”? Regardless of who the original author was, what if we always made some effort, no matter how small, to improve the module? What would be the result?

I think if we all followed that simple rule, we would see the end of the relentless deterioration of our software systems. Instead, our systems would gradually get better and better as they evolved. We would also see teams caring for the system as a whole, rather than just individuals caring for their own small part.

I don’t think this rule is too much to ask. You don’t have to make every module perfect before you check it in. You simply have to make it a little bit better than when you checked it out. Of course, this means that any code you add to a module must be clean. It also means that you clean up at least one other thing before you check the ...

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