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Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Databases by John V. Petersen

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Create Advanced Queries

At this point, you have seen the basic features of the Access Query Designer. Creating advanced queries with the designer is almost as simple as creating basic queries. Consider a simple employee listing that outputs the EmployeeID, employee classification, firstname, and lastname fields. As you already know, the employee classification description field is contained in the Employee Class table. This means the query will require two tables and a join statement. Because the relationship is stored in the database, you don’t have to remember the details of the join. When you create the query and add the Employee and Employee Class tables, the join will automatically appear. Figure 10.17 illustrates how this query will appear ...

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