Accessing Picture Details
The fastest and easiest way to start fixing and finessing your photos is to highlight
the image you want to work with in the thumbnail view within My Pictures, and
then press the More Info button on the remote control (Details, if you have an HP
system). This works equally well if you are displaying the photo in full-screen mode
or in a slide show, or simply have it highlighted in the thumbnail view. You’ll
instantly be presented with the Picture Details screen (see Figure 19.1), which
includes the following choices:
Play Slide Show
Rotate (left)
Rotate (right)
Print
Touch Up
Next
Previous
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ABSOLUTE BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO WINDOWS XP MEDIA CENTER
FIGURE 19.1
The Picture
Details screen is
the control center
for moving and
manipulating
images from
within the My
Pictures interface.
Using the tabs on the left side of the Picture Details screen, you can launch a slide
show, rotate the image, print it, fix it, or click to view a different image. Let’s take a
look at some of these controls individually, beginning with the most interesting and
powerful.
The Touch Up Control
When you select the Touch Up option from the Picture Details screen, Media Center
may present you with a range of options for correcting common problems associated
with digital photos (see Figure 19.2).
CHAPTER 19 PREPARING AND SHARING DIGITAL IMAGES
255
FIGURE 19.2
This screen gives
you an opportu-
nity to tweak
your digital
images.
The business end of the Touch Up menu gives you a choice of the following common
procedures for doctoring up your digital images:
Red Eye
Contrast
In addition, you’ll also have options to save or cancel these operations.
Red Eye
This is another prime example of how the ease of using Media Center’s simple push-
button features can lull you into thinking that nothing very special is going on.
With remote-control ease, you can instruct Media Center to scrutinize your image
and automatically apply the fix your photo needs.
To remove red-eye distortion, simply highlight the Red Eye tab and press OK on the
remote (see Figure 19.3).
What is red-eye, anyway? In this case, it’s not an optical disease, but a visual distor-
tion that occurs when the light from your flash hits the subject’s eyes at just the right
angle, causing a bright red reflection from the blood vessels in a person’s retinas. If
you seem to have a bigger problem with red-eye when you take pictures of kids, it’s
no accident. Children’s pupils are larger and have less coloring than adults, com-
pounding the problem. People with blue or gray eyes also tend to reflect more light
to the lens.
Luckily, the Touch Up feature does a pretty good job of repairing red-eye distortion,
but if you want to try to avoid having red-eye occur in the first place, here are a few
things to try:
Turn on all the room lights. This should make the subject’s pupils contract,
reducing red-eye reflections.
Ask the subject to look at a bright light just before they say “cheese.”
Ask your subject not to look directly at the lens, but slightly away from it.
If your flash is detachable, move it away from the camera lens.
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ABSOLUTE BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO WINDOWS XP MEDIA CENTER
FIGURE 19.3
The check mark
next to Red Eye
indicates that
Media Center’s
Touch Up feature
has corrected the
red-eye in your
image.
Contrast
The Contrast tab allows you to automatically optimize the light and
dark areas of your image. If you want to compare
the image before and after the contrast fix, select
the tab to remove the check mark. If you prefer
the way the picture looks with the contrast opti-
mized, select Contrast again. The check mark will
be replaced and you can then select Save (if you
try to exit without saving, you’ll be confronted
with the warning screen shown in Figure 19.4).
After selecting the Contrast option and saving the
image, you’ll automatically be returned to the
Picture Details page.
Be sure that you want
My Pictures to make the
changes before you
select Save, because
there’s no going back!
After the changes are made, you
won’t be able to undo them.
caution

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