O'Reilly logo

Accounting All-in-One For Dummies by Jill Gilbert Welytok, Tage C. Tracy, John A. Tracy, Vijay S. Sampath, Maire Loughran, Frimette Kass-shraibman, Mark P. Holtzman, Lita Epstein, Ken Boyd

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 4

Accounting for Change with Variance Analysis

In This Chapter

arrow Understanding and setting standard costs

arrow Figuring out direct materials prices and direct labor rates

arrow Using formulas to compute variances

arrow Exploiting a shortcut for calculating direct material and direct labor variances

arrow Identifying variances that require further investigation

When things don't go according to plan, inevitably you're left asking “Why?” To find the answer, examine the factors under your control. For example, suppose you don't like to diet. As an accountant, you should enjoy counting calories. But maybe you don't. Maybe you don't like to exercise either. That said, if you weigh yourself only to find that you're gaining rather than losing weight, you may ask “Why?” You thought you were being so careful this week. Why did you gain three pounds? It all comes down to three factors under your control: what you eat and drink, how much you eat and drink, and how much you exercise. Examining each of these ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required