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Advanced Programming in the UNIX® Environment, Third Edition by Stephen A. Rago, W. Richard Stevens

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16. Network IPC: Sockets

16.1. Introduction

In the previous chapter, we looked at pipes, FIFOs, message queues, semaphores, and shared memory—the classical methods of IPC provided by various UNIX systems. These mechanisms allow processes running on the same computer to communicate with one another. In this chapter, we look at the mechanisms that allow processes running on different computers (connected to a common network) to communicate with one another—network IPC.

In this chapter, we describe the socket network IPC interface, which can be used by processes to communicate with other processes, regardless of where they are running — on the same machine or on different machines. Indeed, this was one of the design goals of the socket interface. ...

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