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Algorithms in a Nutshell by Gary Pollice, Stanley Selkow, George T. Heineman

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Colophon

The animal on the cover of Algorithms in a Nutshell is a hermit crab (Pagurus bernhardus). More than 500 species of hermit crabs exist. Mostly aquatic, they live in saltwater in shallow coral reefs and tide pools. Some hermit crabs, however, especially in the tropics, are terrestrial. The robber crab, which can grow as large as a coconut, is one such example. Even terrestrial hermit crabs carry a small amount of water in their shells to help them breathe and keep their abdomens moist.

Unlike true crabs, hermit crabs do not have a hard shell of their own and must seek refuge from predators in the abandoned shells of gastropods (snails). They are particularly fond of the discarded shells of periwinkles and whelks. As they grow bigger, they have to find a new shell to inhabit. Leaving any part of themselves exposed would make them more susceptible to predators; in addition, not having a well-fitted shell stunts their growth. Because intact gastropod shells are limited, shell competition is an issue.

Hermit crabs are decapod (which literally means "ten footed") crustaceans. Of their five pairs of legs, the first two are pincers, or grasping claws, the larger one of which they use to defend themselves and shred food. The smaller claw is used for eating. The second and third pairs of legs help them walk, and the final two pairs help keep them in their shells.

Characteristic of crustaceans, hermit crabs do not have an internal skeleton but rather a hard exoskeleton of calcium. They ...

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