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Job no:81378-5 Title : RP_All Access (New PB Verdions) Client : Pro-vision
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175 Size : 203.2(w)254(h)mm Co : M6 (mac J)
Dept : DTP D/O : 22.10.05 (Job no:000000 D/O : 00.00.04 Co: CM0)
5th Black
p51
51
V
ictore’s search began early. “I grew up on a military base during the final years of the
Vietnam War. My father flew missions in an air-refueling KC-135”—a military tanker based
on the same design as the Boeing 707. “He was away most of my childhood. My mom
worked. I was a latchkey kid. This period is the basis of everything for me. The solitude forced me
to create a world to live in. I still do that. I have always had a very active imagination. I also gained
a healthy dose of ‘Question Authority’ from this period. This motto was printed on buttons back
then—I think the large questions that I ask of my country in my posters come from being reared
in this time and in the military. I had Question Authority drawn on my jeans. I drew heavily all
the time—monsters, dinosaurs, cars, planes, superheroes, nekkid ladies, usual kid’s stuff.”
T
OMASZEWSKI “My mom worked at the university in the reference department of the
library. There I learned to love books and the value and skills of research.” In the library he
also found old design annuals. “I was influenced by the work of American and European
designers. Remember, I was eight. I saw my influences very early on. When I saw some of the
work of the Eastern Europeans, I realized they couldn’t really draw very well, either,” Victore jokes.
He was immediately drawn to their spirit and command of the craft. “I loved them. Henryk
Tomaszewski especially appealed to me. His work was so completely free from any self-criticism.
Or so it seemed.” Tomaszewski’s work would prove a lasting obsession, and his influence
is clearly visible in all stages of Victore’s work. “His stuff just didn’t seem to follow any rules.
I grew up with rules—How to stand. How to follow the norm. How to get a college degree, even
if you don’t want one. What I love about Tomaszewski’s work and some of his students’ work
is that it does the same job as regular design—gets people to buy, attend, and so on—but it has
a humanity to it. It looks like one person made it. When was the last time that happened here?
Fuck—we see work these days, bad work, with a list of seven creators, writers, AD, CD, PH,
but there is no opinion. Why is design always looking to the street for its message? Because
the street is the truth. The truth is always the best answer.”
Describing himself as “just a working stiff who gives a damn,”
James Victore seeks truth and strives for the artistic liberation
that comes with it. His work is politically charged, not because
of any partisan agenda but because it has a clear point of view—
Victore’s truth, shown his way. Sometimes brash, sometimes
seductive, but always immediate, his work makes it impossible
for you to close your mind.
VICTORE
1987 1989 NOW
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6
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JAMES
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