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Asterisk: The Future of Telephony by Leif Madsen, Jared Smith, Jim Van Meggelen

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Chapter 1. A Telephony Revolution

It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people’s minds.

—Samuel Adams

An incredible revolution is under way. It has been a long time in coming, but now that it has started, there will be no stopping it. It is taking place in an area of technology that has lapsed embarrassingly far behind every other industry that calls itself high-tech. The industry is telecommunications, and the revolution is being fueled by an open source Private Branch eXchange (PBX) called Asterisk TM.

Telecommunications is arguably the last major electronics industry that has (until now) remained untouched by the open source revolution. Major telecommunications manufacturers still build ridiculously expensive, incompatible systems, running complicated, ancient code on impressively engineered yet obsolete hardware.

As an example, Nortel’s Business Communications Manager kludges together a Windows NT 4.0 server, a 15-year-old VXWorks-based Key Telephone Switch, and a 700-MHz PC. All this can be yours for between 5 and 15 thousand dollars, not including telephones. If you want it to actually do anything interesting, you’ll have to pay extra licensing fees for closed, limited-functionality, shrink-wrapped applications. Customization? Forget it—it’s not in the plan. Future technology and standards compliance? Give them a year or two—they’re working on it.

All of the major telecommunications manufacturers offer similar-minded products. They don’t want you to have flexibility or choice; they want you to be locked in to their product cycles.

Asterisk changes all that. With Asterisk, no one is telling you how your phone system works, or what technology you are limited to. If you want it, you can have it. Asterisk lovingly embraces the concept of standards compliance, while also enjoying the freedom to develop its own innovations. What you choose to implement is up to you-Asterisk imposes no limits.

Naturally, this incredible flexibility comes with a price: Asterisk is not a simple system to configure. This is not because it’s illogical, confusing, or cryptic; to the contrary, it is very sensible and practical. People’s eyes light up when they first see an Asterisk dialplan and begin to contemplate the possibilities. But when there are literally thousands of ways to achieve a result, the process naturally requires extra effort. Perhaps it can be compared to building a house: the components are relatively easy to understand, but a person contemplating such a task must either a) enlist competent help or b) develop the required skills through instruction, practice, and a good book on the subject.

VoIP: Bridging the Gap Between Traditional Telephony and Network Telephony

While Voice over IP (VoIP) is often thought of as little more than a method of obtaining free long-distance calling, the real value (and—let’s be honest—challenge as well) of VoIP is that it allows voice to become nothing more than another application in the data network.

It sometimes seems that we’ve forgotten that the purpose of the telephone is to allow people to communicate. It is a simple goal, really, and it should be possible for us to make it happen in far more flexible and creative ways than are currently available to us. Since the industry has demonstrated an unwillingness to pursue this goal, a large community of passionate people have taken on the task.

The challenge comes from the fact that an industry that has changed very little in the last century shows little interest in starting now.

The Zapata Telephony Project

The Zapata Telephony Project was conceived of by Jim Dixon, a telecommunications consulting engineer who was inspired by the incredible advances in CPU speeds that the computer industry has now come to take for granted. Dixon’s belief was that far more economical telephony systems could be created if a card existed that had nothing more on it than the basic electronic components required to interface with a telephone circuit. Rather than having expensive components on the card, Digital Signal Processing (DSP) [1] would be handled in the CPU by software. While this would impose a tremendous load on the CPU, Dixon was certain that the low cost of CPUs relative to their performance made them far more attractive than expensive DSPs, and, more importantly, that this price/performance ratio would continue to improve as CPUs continued to increase in power.

Like so many visionaries, Dixon believed that many others would see this opportunity, and that he merely had to wait for someone else to create what to him was an obvious improvement. After a few years, he noticed that not only had no one created these cards, but it seemed unlikely that anyone was ever going to. At that point it was clear that if he wanted a revolution, he was going to have to start it himself. And so the Zapata Telephony Project was born.

Since this concept was so revolutionary, and was certain to make a lot of waves in the industry, I decided on the Mexican revolutionary motif, and named the technology and organization after the famous Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata. I decided to call the card the ‘tormenta’ which, in Spanish, means ’storm,’ but contextually is usually used to imply a big storm, like a hurricane or such.[2]

Perhaps we should be calling ourselves Asteristas. Regardless, we owe Jim Dixon a debt of thanks, partly for thinking this up and partly for seeing it through, but mostly for giving the results of his efforts to the open source community. As a result of Jim’s contribution, Asterisk’s Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) engine came to be.



[1] The term DSP also means Digital Signal Processor, which is a device (usually a chip) that is capable of interpreting and modifying signals of various sorts. In a voice network, DSPs are primarily responsible for encoding, decoding, and transcoding audio information. This can require a lot of computational effort.

[2] Jim Dixon, “The History of Zapata Telephony and How It Relates to the Asterisk PBX” (http://www.asteriskdocs.org/modules/tinycontent/index.php?id=10).

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