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Beginning ASP.NET 3.5 in C# 2008: From Novice to Professional, Second Edition by Matthew MacDonald

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11.3. Pages with Multiple Views

In a typical website, you'll surf through many separate pages. For example, if you want to add an item to your shopping cart and take it to the checkout in an e-commerce site, you'll need to jump from one page to another. This design has its advantages—namely, it lets you carefully separate different tasks into different code files. It also presents some challenges; for example, you need to come up with a way to transfer information from one page to another (a topic that's covered in detail in Chapter 8).

However, in some cases it makes more sense to create a single page that can handle several different tasks. For example, you might want to provide several views of the same data (such as a grid-based view and ...

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