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Beginning HTML5 and CSS3 For Dummies by Chris Minnick, Ed Tittel

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21

Ten HTML Do’s and Don’ts

In This Chapter

arrow Concentrating on content

arrow Going easy on the graphics, bells, whistles, and roaring dinosaurs

arrow Creating well-formulated HTML and then testing, testing, testing

arrow Keeping it interesting after the building is over

By itself, HTML is neither particularly complex nor extremely difficult. HTML ain’t rocket science, as some high-tech wags (including a few rocket scientists) have put it. Nevertheless, important do’s and don’ts can make or break the web pages you build with HTML and CSS. Consider these humble suggestions as guidelines for making the most of your markup without losing touch with your users (or watching your page blow up on its launch pad).

If points we make throughout this book seem to crop up here, too — especially regarding proper and improper use of HTML — it’s no accident. Heed ye well the prescriptions and avoid ye the maledictions. But hey, they’re your pages. You can do what you want. Your users will decide the ultimate outcome. (We’d never say, “We told you so.” Would we?)

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